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I’m no longer the young whipper-snapper I use to be

I’m trying to hold back the slow, methodical footsteps of time.

I do all the right things: I wear a pedometer so I know when I reach my 10,000 steps a day; I keep mentally stimulated playing brain games and learning new languages; I now eat whole grains and a variety of fruits and vegetables; and I try to stay socially active by dating numerous women. (No Rita, I am just kidding!).

Then I realize I am no longer the young whipper-snapper I use to be.

And how do I know? Friends start giving me Kleenexes when my nose, without informing me, starts dripping like an old pipe. I mention Ma Bell to my adult children and they want to know who she is. Among my younger friends I realize I am the only one who knows how to spell Alzheimers. And I now empathize with the woman who was looking for someone with younger legs to mow her yard, because at 87 she had finally reached the age when she couldn’t “cut the mustard, let alone the grass.” But then there isn’t much I can do about the quickening passage of time. I will just have to accept it and adapt with humor and grace and enjoy this precious life adventure.

The Dalles will soon be under the spell of this year’s Cherry Festival. At the Mid-Columbia Senior Center before the parade you can enjoy a delicious breakfast of French Toast, scrambled eggs, a choice of bacon or sausage plus fruit and your favorite beverage (that is your favorite morning beverage). The breakfast starting at 7:30 a.m. is sponsored by the center’s neighbor to the north: Cherry Heights Retirement Community. At the breakfast you can purchase raffle tickets for the one-of-a-kind quilt with 15 historical pictures of The Dalles hand stitched into it.

For those wondering who will be the speaker at the 11 a.m. Tuesday lecture April 30, I don’t know since I haven’t gotten around to lining anyone up yet. You will have to be surprised. But on May 15 I do know that Valerie Kendrick, director of Great-n-Small, will be discussing “Ages and Stages” of child development for all the grandmothers and grandfathers in the audience. It will help you understand why kids act the way they do and most importantly what you can do about it.

There is still room on the bus for the center’s day trip to the Hulda Klager Lilac Gardens, a national historic site located in Woodland, Wash., and the subject of Jean Kirkpatrick’s 2012 historical novel “Where Lilacs Still Bloom.” The trip is only $25 for admission and transportation. For more information call the center at 541-296-4788.

And before the snow recedes and the rivers rise, playing tonight at the center is Mark Womble and the Sugar Daddies. On April 30, “For the Good Times” will play for your dancing and listening enjoyment. Music starts at 7 p.m., everyone is welcome and donations are appreciated to feed the animals and to keep the lights on.

It was the best response ever for a “Remember When” question and I never would have guessed it would be for “Bag Balm” the ointment originally used to soothe irritation on cows' udders but found to also be good for the treatment of chapped and irritated skin. (And the winner from the 20 entries was Lucy Rice.) But let’s go with one last question from the Home Remedy Department - thanks to Jess Birge. What was the oil many mothers used for anything that ailed you: from constipation to diarrhea and headaches, muscle pain, skin conditions in between. E-mail your answer to mcseniorcenter@gmail.com, call 541-296-4788 or send it with a potted Ricinus communis plant from the Mediterranean region.

Well, it has been another week sneaking around the corner to see what lies ahead. Until we meet again, you know it’s not going to be one of your better days when you mistakenly pour your cereal into your juice cup instead of your cereal bowl.

menu

Wednesday 24) Roast Pork and Gravy

Thursday (25) Taco Casserole with Chips

Friday (26) Philly Beef Sandwich with Mushrooms and Onions

Monday (29) Ham and Squash

Tuesday (30) Glazed Meatballs over Noodles

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