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Looking back, Aug. 9

August 11

20 Years Ago-1993

The Dalles city councilors may soon be elected by city-wide vote, not from various wards. The City Council itself strongly favors several changes to the City Charter, including abolishment of the present city ward system. Other changes considered at last night’s council work session included adding another member to the Council, giving the mayor a vote and changing the way city ordinances are approved. The Charter is essentially the city’s constitution, dictating procedures for passing laws and appointing both elected and hired leaders. It was first written in 1898, and has been altered several times since.

Politics, not facts, seem to be impetus for the doubling of grazing fees on federal lands, a Wasco-Sherman County extension agent said. Cattle ranchers are an easy political target, perceived as wealthy people being subsidized by taxpayers, said Sandy Macnab, Oregon State University Extension Agent for Wasco and Sherman Counties. The U.S. Department of the Interior Monday announced a new rate schedule that would more than double monthly grazing fees over three years, from $1.96 per head to $4.28.

40 Years Ago-1973

Another construction strike has halted work on many projects including two of the three major construction jobs underway in The Dalles. Pickets from the carpenters’ and laborers union appeared at The Dalles Dam Monday morning. That stopped work that had just resumed last Monday when a strike involving the Operating Engineers had been settled. Work was also halted at the construction of a new wing at The Dalles General Hospital when pickets appeared there. Work at Columbia Basin Nursing Home’s new addition is going on as that project has not been picketed and was not picketed during the earlier strike.

The Dalles Auction Yard, participating heavily in a process that will lead to export of hundreds of animals across the Pacific, received 100 head of Holstein heifers Monday. The animals will be airlifted to South Korea about the first of September, said Chuck Deisch, manager of the yard. Authorized as a quarantine yard for export animals, The Dalles Auction Yard is believed to be the only one of its kind taking part in the program. The 100 Holsteins, about two years old and weighing approximately 860 pounds apiece, will undergo a series of checks and inspections to make sure they are free of disease before they go to Korea, Deisch said.

60 Years Ago-1953

Western X is hitting peaches harder than ever and new, more severe types of Rusty Mottle are attacking cherries to such an extent that the two industries may be killed in the Dalles area, Dr. J.A. Milbrath of the experiment station at Oregon State College told a group of orchardists yesterday during the annual field trip. This year’s cherry crop was good and tour officials attributed this to the “disappointingly small” turnout of orchardists. Only about a dozen fruit growers went on the trip to see what is being done to protect their orchards.

Alternate plans for the well and annexation into the city of Columbia Terrace Division Number One highlighted last night’s meeting of Dalles City council. The annexation of the subdivision located south and east of Dry Hollow road was conditioned upon the developer, Modern Home Builders, Inc., from Seattle, making all improvements at no expense to the city. Consisting of about 10 acres, the residential subdivision is the third tract to be annexed into the city in the past three years.

80 Years Ago-1933

Any resident or merchant of The Dalles who fails to cooperate when called for service in the NRA campaign can’t qualify as an American citizen, Dr. Thompson Coberth, general chairman of the local general committee in charge of organization and direction of the recovery drive, told members of the Kiwanis club yesterday. The campaign, according to plans tentatively formulated by members of the committee yesterday, will reach into every home of the city and result in the concentration of the buying power in stores operating under the emblem of the blue eagle. Speakers have been obtained and civic meetings planned so that details of the drive will be known to every resident of each community.

Proof of claims covering deposits aggregating more than $1125000 in defunct First National Bank of The Dalles, have been filed with O.A Carlson, receiver. The final date for filing claims is August 31. According to the last statement as to the condition of the bank before the moratorium was declared October 21, 1932, the deposits aggregated $1,591,069.96. The proof of claims which have been filed cover approximately 75 per cent of this figure, the receiver said this morning.

100 Years Ago-1913

That the orchards in the vicinity of The Dalles are in good condition and free from pests has again been proven. On the invitation of A.C. Churchill, of the Churchill-Matthews Company, owner of the Dufur Orchard tracts, one of the largest in the Pacific Northwest, Professor W. Ballard of Pullman, Wash., specialist of the horticultural branch of the college made a thorough inspection of the condition of the company’s tract. Their findings are highly gratifying. They report that the tract is entirely free from pests of any kind.

The following suggestions from local fruit growers have been submitted to Secretary Judd S. Fish of the Business Men’s associate by Hyman H. Cohen, commercial editor of the Portland Journal: I note that cantaloupe shippers of The Dalles are losing much money annually, besides causing much worry and trouble among wholesalers and retailers because they do not put up a uniform pack. There will be big cants and very small ones in the same crate and the dealer is unable to tell what the stock is worth. I would suggest that besides a uniform package, cantaloupe growers-shippers place the total number of fruit in the package, on the box so that buyers and sellers can thereby judge its value.

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