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Looking Back, Sept. 1

September 1

20 Years Ago-1993

Chad Hillard, a senior at The Dalles High School, will be spending the next month in Los Angeles for auditions that he hopes will lead to a career in movies and television. Hillard is one of just five aspirants for Oregon that will be attending the session in Los Angeles. He was selected for the audition session after attending a seminar in Portland. While in Los Angeles, Hillard will be auditioning, doing screen tests, having interviews and doing cold readings for both motion pictures and television.

The Decision at The Dalles, as presented at Crate’s Point Living History Park, has inspired the creation of a short operetta. The musical, created by Billy Krieg, was one of the interpreters at Crate’s Point who is known there as Capt. McClintock. A press release says “the musical presents the humor and incurable optimism of our forefathers when faced with adversity. This production also faces the possibility (according to McClintock) of becoming a classic that gives special meaning to The Dalles as the “Point of Decision.” Most of the dialogue is created spontaneously by the actors.

40 Years Ago-1973

The Dalles will become the first major city in Oregon (outside of the Portland area) to be served by a modern long distance calling system which allows telephone users to dial most kinds of long distance calls themselves. The service change took place today at 11 a.m. It will affect Pacific Northwest Bell customers in The Dalles and Dallesport.

Russ Farley, PNB manager, says after the change to the Traffic Service Position System (TSPS), calls such as collect, person-to-person, third party and credit calls will be routed to TSPS operators in Portland. “With TSPS,” he says, “instead of dialing just “Operator” when making these operator-assisted type calls, phone users will dial the numeral “O,” the area code (if needed) and the seen digit number being called.

The new accounting machine approved by the Council is now in service at The Dalles City Hall. The machine, a Burroughs L 5000 magnetic record computer, will be used in billing, receipting and maintaining approximately 4,000 water and sewer service accounts; for city payroll including checks, employee records and payroll reports for approximately 125 employees; and for accounting and control records for the approximately 500 line item accounts in the $3 million-plus budget. Account payable checks will be written and posted on the new machine.

60 Years Ago-1953

Wasco County’s peach crop is finally being harvested, although not at a peak rate, after being delayed by rain, wind and generally cool weather. Local processors report they are beginning to receive the more popular peach varieties, Hales and Elbertas, in fairly large quantity.

But the peak of the harvest is yet to come. E.H. Rorick, manager of the Oregon State Employment Service office, said a few calls have been received for peach pickers. He noted, however, that the demand for pickers in this area is never heavy, but added that fewer calls than usual have come in so far.

The Harvey Machine Company will continue to enjoy a second preference rating just behind public agencies for power from the Bonneville Power Administration to serve its proposed aluminum plant at The Dalles. Bonneville Administrator Paul J. Raver was quoted by United Press as saying that industries such as Harvey and Kaiser Aluminum will continue to enjoy this second preference behind public utilities. The two companies are already under contract with BPA for a total of 1,052,460 kilowatts of firm power.

80 Years Ago-1933

Approximately half the wheat farmers of Wasco County have signed contracts to participate in the government allotment program, calling for the reduction of acreage in return for cash payments. The program is designed to control the production of wheat and bolster the market price, giving the farmer increased return for the commodity. The contracts signed throughout the county, will cover approximately one half the wheat acreage, according to a report today by W. Wray Lawrence, county agent.

The warning clang of the fire bells and the shrieking of sirens this afternoon initiated a spectacular downtown Old For Dales Frolics stunt, when The Dalles Fire Department ancient hand pumper engine, which came around the Horn in 1859, was pressed into service for the first time in the Twentieth century to extinguished a fire which threatened to destroy every building in the vicinity of Second and Court Streets. It must be admitted that the fire was not too big a threat, but columns of smoke pouring from a house moved to the prominent corner for the purpose were realistic enough for the purpose, and the immense crowd was thrilled when the brave fire ladies came tearing down Court Street, made hasty hose connections and began pumping streams of water on the burning building.

100 Years Ago-1913

Twenty Mill Creek residents who live south of this city desperately fought a forest fire from 2 o’clock yesterday afternoon until 11 o’clock last night, when they finally controlled the flames. The fire started near the Ellis Ranch and burned along the hill on the east side of Mill Creek, covering a section one mile wide and two miles long. Some pine and oak timber was destroyed.

J.D. Stack of Portland, assistant general manager and superintendent of the first division of the Oregon-Washington Railroad & Navigation Company, spent Saturday afternoon here in conference with the business men regarding the proposed extension of the fill in the Mill Creek ravine to the Mill Creek tunnel.

The present plan of the railroad is to fill only a part of the ravine. It is estimated that the city would probably have to pay for only a small share of the proposed fill, as it would be only the part which would be made into a 60 foot street west of the Hotel Dalles corner.

Looking Back is compiled by CeCe Fix from Chronicle archives.

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