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How federal budget cuts could affect Oregon

SENATE DEMOCRATIC leaders finish a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington Feb. 28 after answering questions about the impending automatic spending cuts that take effect today. From right to left are, Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin of Ill., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.

SENATE DEMOCRATIC leaders finish a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington Feb. 28 after answering questions about the impending automatic spending cuts that take effect today. From right to left are, Senate Majority Whip Sen. Richard Durbin of Ill., Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

PORTLAND (AP) — The White House compiled the numbers from federal agencies and its own budget office to show how cuts brought by sequestration will affect Oregon and other states.

The inability of Congress to agree on a package of spending cuts and tax revenue increases is expected to bring $85 billion in cuts between March-September.

As to whether states could move money around to cover shortfalls, the White House said that depends on each state’s budget structures and the specific programs.

The White House did not have a list of which states or programs might have flexibility.

Some examples of programs that could be cut in Oregon include:

Education

• $10.2 million for primary and secondary

education, putting around 140 teacher and aide jobs at risk. About 40 fewer schools would receive funding.

—$6.4 million for education of children with disabilities, jeopardizing the jobs of 80 teachers, aides and staff.

—About 240 fewer low-income students would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college.

—About 600 children would lose access to Head Start and Early Head Start.

ENVIRONMENT:

—$1.9 million to ensure clean water and air quality, and to prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste.

—$1.1 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.

MILITARY:

—Furloughs for 3,000 civilian Department of Defense workers would reduce gross pay by $16.5 million.

—Base operation funding for the Army would be cut by about $1.6 million.

POLICE:

—$155,000 in grants that support law enforcement, courts, corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, and crime victim initiatives.

EMPLOYMENT:

—$470,000 for job search assistance, referral and placement.

CHILD CARE:

—Up to 300 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care.

VACCINES:

—1,670 fewer children would receive vaccines.

PUBLIC HEALTH:

—$890,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in about 3,800 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs.

—$366,000 in funds to help Oregon upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological events.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:

—$81,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence.

SENIORS:

— $690,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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