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World and national news in brief

May Day Protests Blossom

Indonesian workers with their faces and bodies painted in white and an Indonesian word "Buruh" that means "Workers" in red take part in a rally commemorating May Day in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 1, 2013.

May Day Protests Blossom Indonesian workers with their faces and bodies painted in white and an Indonesian word "Buruh" that means "Workers" in red take part in a rally commemorating May Day in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 1, 2013. AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim

Plan B available to 15 and up

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a surprise twist to the decade-plus effort to ease access to morning-after pills, the government is lowering the age limit to 15 for one brand — Plan B One-Step — and will let it be sold over the counter.

Today, Plan B and its generic competition are sold behind pharmacy counters, and people must prove they’re 17 or older to buy the emergency contraception without a prescription. A federal judge had ordered an end to those sales restrictions by next Monday.

But Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration approved a different approach: Plan B could sit on drugstore shelves next to condoms, spermicides or other women’s health products — but to make the purchase, buyers must prove they’re 15 or older at the cash register.

Discovery shows cannibalism

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists say they have found the first solid archaeological evidence that some of the earliest American colonists survived harsh conditions by resorting to cannibalism.

On Wednesday, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and archaeologists from Jamestown announced the discovery of the bones of a 14-year-old girl with clear signs that she was cannibalized.

The human remains date back to the deadly winter of 1609-1610, known as the “starving time” in Jamestown, when hundreds of colonists died. Scientists have said the settlers arrived from England during the worst drought in 800 years.

For years, there had been unconfirmed tales of starving early colonists resorting to eating dogs, mice, snakes, shoe leather and even their own dead.

Turkmenistan president falls

MOSCOW (AP) — Seeing the president slam face-first into the ground after falling from a speeding horse would be a shock to any nation. In authoritarian Turkmenistan, many residents didn’t even get the chance.

President Gurbanguli Berdymukhamedov apparently wasn’t seriously injured Sunday when his horse stumbled and he pitched into the dirt track at the hippodrome on the outskirts of the capital, Ashgabat. But the fall was certainly a wound to the pride of the 55-year-old Central Asian leader, whose all-powerful personality cult portrays him as effortlessly competent.

Thousands of people were in the stands for the race that celebrated Turkmenistan’s renowned desert racehorse breed, the Akhal-Teke. But state television’s video of the race cut off just before the fall and the extensive written reports on the event didn’t mention the plunge.

Baby gets free rides for life

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Who says there's no such thing as a free ride?

Mexico City's mayor says a baby boy born in one of the city's subway stations will be allowed to ride the trains free for life.

The baby's 22-year-old mother was trying to take the subway to the hospital when she went into labor Tuesday.

Subway employees, police and paramedics helped her give birth in an entryway to a platform.

Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera wrote in his Twitter account late Tuesday the yet-unnamed boy will have the right to ride the subway free for life.

Subway tickets in Mexico City cost three pesos (25 cents) for an unlimited ride.

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