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Looking back on Aug. 3

August 3

20 Years Ago-1994

The Dalles may get through the summer without rationing water, said Public works Director William Keyser. Originally the city saw July 1 as the day it would implement water restrictions for this year. A wet spring pushed the date back to Aug. 1. Now, despite a hot summer, public conservation may keep the city off restrictions for the entire year, Keyser said. “We are looking at stretching it as far as we can,” he said. Currently the reservoir behind Crow Creek Dam, which supplies much of the city’s water, is 86 percent full. When the level falls below 80 percent, the city starts looking at water rationing, Keyser said.

The city of The Dalles will soon be looking for a new public works director. After more than 29 years with the city’s public works department, William Keyser has elected to take advantage of the city’s early retirement incentive program and will leave his post Sept. 30. “I’m ready to move on to other interests — possibly a career change,” Keyser said. “I feel good about it.” Also taking advantage of the early retirement incentives is Risk Manager John Dennee and Municipal Court Clerk Jo Barry. Dennee has 17½ years with the city; Barry has 21½ years. Both Dennee and Barry said they will leave at the end of October, said city Manager William Elliott.

40 Years Ago-1974

Tolls on the Wasco County Bridge, across the Columbia River in The Dalles, will be taken off not to be collected after October 31, 1974. Bonds on the bridge will be paid off then, and the county has reached an agreement with the Oregon State Highway Department to take over the bridge. This report from County Judge Hugh Elder who said that the court met with the OSHD this week and ironed out the particulars. The county has been discussing with the state the takeover of the bridge.

The demolition of the Whittier School, which is in progress, brings to mind the many hundreds of former students who passed through its doors in its 76 years of continuous service. It is for these people that I examined its history. I have looked through my father’s records and clippings of the early school years and share the history it represents. My father, John Gavin, was Superintendent of Schools from 1892 until 1899, and had an active interest in the development of the school system for many years. Until 1854, the schools were maintained within the Fort for protection. In 1854 the military established a school in a single room log cabin. The location was described as being about a block southeast of the present high school building. Written by Grace Gavin Lewis.

60 Years Ago-1954

Citizens of The Dalles may soon be warned of fires by the shriek of a siren instead of the bell alarm now in use on the city fire tower, if Fire Chief Leon Mohr succeeds in gaining approval of the city council for purchase of the siren. Mohr states that volunteer firemen have difficulty in hearing the bell signal distinctly, especially during the summer when strong winds are prevalent.

The Fraternal Order of Eagles enjoyed a very interesting and educational talk last night following the regular business meeting, when C.W. Beltz of Hood River addressed the Eagles on behalf of the “Old Age Revolving Pension Bill.” This bill, which provides for a pension of $200 a month to everyone 60 years and over, provided those receiving it spend the entire amount in the one month, was drawn up at the last congress and is expected to come before the coming congress.

80 Years Ago-1934

Many persons here yesterday wondered where Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt bought gasoline for her car, after the long trip from Bend to The Dalles. Mrs. Lillie Tindall, Rowena correspondent of The Chronicle, today reported that she had performed the task of servicing the “first lady’s car,” at a gasoline station at Rowena. Mrs. Tindall reported that Gertrude Bowen, society editor of the Morning Oregonian, approached Mrs. Roosevelt and attempted to obtain an interview while the car was being serviced. Mrs. Roosevelt courteously denied the request. Mrs. Tindall reported that she was highly impressed with the courtesy and charm of Mrs. Roosevelt.

Most persons in The Dalles who could, chose to make today a holiday for seeing President Roosevelt as he stopped at Bonneville Dam to inspect it and make his address from Bradford Island. A special train to Bonneville and return carried 225 persons from The Dalles and communities in Wasco and Sherman counties to see the president, and un-estimated numbers left early this morning by automobile. The train, which departed from the Union Pacific depot at 10:30 a.m. was to pick up 400 more passengers at Hood River.

100 Years Ago-1914

Three husbands are looking for Mrs. Lillie Martin, each one claiming to be the legal spouse and each declaring she got some of his money. This came to light yesterday when Fred Wise called at the police station and asked that search be made for his wife, says the Portland Oregonian. More than a week ago J.W. Martin of The Dalles came to the station and told Desk Patrolman Thompson that his wife had left him. A few days before that August Anderson had made the same complaint, but until the appearance of Wise on the scene yesterday the two incidents were not connected. Wise says he married Mrs. Martin who said she was a widower, in Montana a year ago. His home was in Spokane and he had considerable property there. In all he has given her about $4,000, he says. Both Anderson and Martin said she had some of their money, too. While Martin was in Portland looking for her, the woman was living with Wise at 448 Columbia Street, it was said. She left him on Monday. Mrs. Martin, or Mrs. Wise, or Mrs. Anderson has with her a 6-year-old daughter, who is deaf and dumb, besides a parrot and a canary bird.

The city council held its regular monthly meeting last night, transacting considerable routine business. T.A. Hudson, chairman of the water commission, informed Mayor French and his council that the commission had decided to purchase four drinking fountains to be placed in the city, provided the council would authorize the small cost of installation. The aldermen accepted the proposition and the street committee was given power to select the sites for the four fountains. An ordinance was passed amending the general saloon ordinance so as to reduce, from $100 to $50, the amount which druggists shall annually pay for selling liquor in original packages, and eliminating the provision compelling the druggists to keep a register of all liquor disposed of, to whom sold and for what purpose. Alderman Kirchhoffer voted against the ordinance because it didn’t also reduce the saloon licenses. August 3

20 Years Ago-1994

The Dalles may get through the summer without rationing water, said Public works Director William Keyser. Originally the city saw July 1 as the day it would implement water restrictions for this year. A wet spring pushed the date back to Aug. 1. Now, despite a hot summer, public conservation may keep the city off restrictions for the entire year, Keyser said. “We are looking at stretching it as far as we can,” he said. Currently the reservoir behind Crow Creek Dam, which supplies much of the city’s water, is 86 percent full. When the level falls below 80 percent, the city starts looking at water rationing, Keyser said.

The city of The Dalles will soon be looking for a new public works director. After more than 29 years with the city’s public works department, William Keyser has elected to take advantage of the city’s early retirement incentive program and will leave his post Sept. 30. “I’m ready to move on to other interests — possibly a career change,” Keyser said. “I feel good about it.” Also taking advantage of the early retirement incentives is Risk Manager John Dennee and Municipal Court Clerk Jo Barry. Dennee has 17½ years with the city; Barry has 21½ years. Both Dennee and Barry said they will leave at the end of October, said city Manager William Elliott.

40 Years Ago-1974

Tolls on the Wasco County Bridge, across the Columbia River in The Dalles, will be taken off not to be collected after October 31, 1974. Bonds on the bridge will be paid off then, and the county has reached an agreement with the Oregon State Highway Department to take over the bridge. This report from County Judge Hugh Elder who said that the court met with the OSHD this week and ironed out the particulars. The county has been discussing with the state the takeover of the bridge.

The demolition of the Whittier School, which is in progress, brings to mind the many hundreds of former students who passed through its doors in its 76 years of continuous service. It is for these people that I examined its history. I have looked through my father’s records and clippings of the early school years and share the history it represents. My father, John Gavin, was Superintendent of Schools from 1892 until 1899, and had an active interest in the development of the school system for many years. Until 1854, the schools were maintained within the Fort for protection. In 1854 the military established a school in a single room log cabin. The location was described as being about a block southeast of the present high school building. Written by Grace Gavin Lewis.

60 Years Ago-1954

Citizens of The Dalles may soon be warned of fires by the shriek of a siren instead of the bell alarm now in use on the city fire tower, if Fire Chief Leon Mohr succeeds in gaining approval of the city council for purchase of the siren. Mohr states that volunteer firemen have difficulty in hearing the bell signal distinctly, especially during the summer when strong winds are prevalent.

The Fraternal Order of Eagles enjoyed a very interesting and educational talk last night following the regular business meeting, when C.W. Beltz of Hood River addressed the Eagles on behalf of the “Old Age Revolving Pension Bill.” This bill, which provides for a pension of $200 a month to everyone 60 years and over, provided those receiving it spend the entire amount in the one month, was drawn up at the last congress and is expected to come before the coming congress.

80 Years Ago-1934

Many persons here yesterday wondered where Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt bought gasoline for her car, after the long trip from Bend to The Dalles. Mrs. Lillie Tindall, Rowena correspondent of The Chronicle, today reported that she had performed the task of servicing the “first lady’s car,” at a gasoline station at Rowena. Mrs. Tindall reported that Gertrude Bowen, society editor of the Morning Oregonian, approached Mrs. Roosevelt and attempted to obtain an interview while the car was being serviced. Mrs. Roosevelt courteously denied the request. Mrs. Tindall reported that she was highly impressed with the courtesy and charm of Mrs. Roosevelt.

Most persons in The Dalles who could, chose to make today a holiday for seeing President Roosevelt as he stopped at Bonneville Dam to inspect it and make his address from Bradford Island. A special train to Bonneville and return carried 225 persons from The Dalles and communities in Wasco and Sherman counties to see the president, and un-estimated numbers left early this morning by automobile. The train, which departed from the Union Pacific depot at 10:30 a.m. was to pick up 400 more passengers at Hood River.

100 Years Ago-1914

Three husbands are looking for Mrs. Lillie Martin, each one claiming to be the legal spouse and each declaring she got some of his money. This came to light yesterday when Fred Wise called at the police station and asked that search be made for his wife, says the Portland Oregonian. More than a week ago J.W. Martin of The Dalles came to the station and told Desk Patrolman Thompson that his wife had left him. A few days before that August Anderson had made the same complaint, but until the appearance of Wise on the scene yesterday the two incidents were not connected. Wise says he married Mrs. Martin who said she was a widower, in Montana a year ago. His home was in Spokane and he had considerable property there. In all he has given her about $4,000, he says. Both Anderson and Martin said she had some of their money, too. While Martin was in Portland looking for her, the woman was living with Wise at 448 Columbia Street, it was said. She left him on Monday. Mrs. Martin, or Mrs. Wise, or Mrs. Anderson has with her a 6-year-old daughter, who is deaf and dumb, besides a parrot and a canary bird.

The city council held its regular monthly meeting last night, transacting considerable routine business. T.A. Hudson, chairman of the water commission, informed Mayor French and his council that the commission had decided to purchase four drinking fountains to be placed in the city, provided the council would authorize the small cost of installation. The aldermen accepted the proposition and the street committee was given power to select the sites for the four fountains. An ordinance was passed amending the general saloon ordinance so as to reduce, from $100 to $50, the amount which druggists shall annually pay for selling liquor in original packages, and eliminating the provision compelling the druggists to keep a register of all liquor disposed of, to whom sold and for what purpose. Alderman Kirchhoffer voted against the ordinance because it didn’t also reduce the saloon licenses.

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