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Feds allow logging after huge California wildfire

In this Friday, July 25, 2014 photo, branches are removed from a tree harvested from the burned by the Rim Fire, is hauled removed from the burn area to be trucked out of the Stanislaus National Forest near Groveland, Calif. Nearly a year after the Rim Fire charred thousands of acres of forest in California's High Sierra, a debate rages over what to do with the dead trees, salvage the timber to pay for forest replanting and restoration or let nature take its course. Environmentalist say that the burned trees and new growth beneath them create vital habitat for dwindling bird such as spotted owls, and black-backed woodpeckers and other wildlife.

AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli
In this Friday, July 25, 2014 photo, branches are removed from a tree harvested from the burned by the Rim Fire, is hauled removed from the burn area to be trucked out of the Stanislaus National Forest near Groveland, Calif. Nearly a year after the Rim Fire charred thousands of acres of forest in California's High Sierra, a debate rages over what to do with the dead trees, salvage the timber to pay for forest replanting and restoration or let nature take its course. Environmentalist say that the burned trees and new growth beneath them create vital habitat for dwindling bird such as spotted owls, and black-backed woodpeckers and other wildlife.



FRESNO, Calif...

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