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Warming shelter schedule leaves some cold

Ruth (Ruthie) Rader sits in a light rain for a photograph against a background of St. Peter’s Landmark, which is located across the street from The Warming Place. The center was closed Wednesday night due to warmer weather, and Rader said she would spend the night under an overhang.

Photo by Mark Gibson
Ruth (Ruthie) Rader sits in a light rain for a photograph against a background of St. Peter’s Landmark, which is located across the street from The Warming Place. The center was closed Wednesday night due to warmer weather, and Rader said she would spend the night under an overhang.



Tonight, most of us will be spending the evening indoors, sleeping in our beds, wrapped in layers of blankets to protect our fragile bodies from the winter chill...

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Comments

ruthiesky 4 years, 4 months ago

I am going to post a response to this article in my blog, "Ruthie In The Sky."

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dragonlady52 4 years, 4 months ago

My heart goes out for Ruthi Radar and all of the other regular homeless folks that not only depend on The Warming Place when its extremely COLD but also the light breakfasts and the meals prepared and served fri/sat/sun.... I was a volunteer for a 12 hr shift until recently when I found a part time job. That experience was one of the most humbling things I have had and the men I met and talked with that night were so polite, grateful and they all shoed up right at 7pm when we open the doors. Something PERMANENT has to be provided in our community for those in need of our help!! Go outside on a 35 degree night and sit on your porch for 30-45 minutes out in the elements, ask yourself as the temps did late in the night, could you keep warm enough to sleep bundled up with everything you own?? We need to do MORE!!!!

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Siriunsun 4 years, 4 months ago

That's a nice thought. When a person who is homeless refuses to work, as in the case of someone who has had many opportunities over 20 years or so to obtain employment and permanent housing, or a homeless person who shows signs of untreated mental illness, including violence, or when theft becomes a problem, how does a community cope? I got burned out on it over the summer. It probably only takes one bad experience with one person to ruin one's perspective of an entire segment of a population, but I still recommend caution. Especially now.

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imdeanna 4 years, 4 months ago

I'm sure my message will be taken wrong, but here goes...

I am ALL for helping when/where I can, I even housed the lady interviewed above, Ruthie, for a weekend once.... but it was not a pleasant experience for me. She had a demeanor of 'expectance' while in my home...even getting mad and yelling at me for coming home at 7pm after having dinner with my daughter, complaining she had to walk UP hill to get to my house and wait for an hour for me to get home, even though I pre-warned her I would be out till the evening on the second night she was to stay. (read her blog, her gratitude was shown by severely bad mouthing me after I housed and fed her)

I am a single mom/grandma who has worked all my life to have my "warm bed' I don't have much, and I struggle every month to make ends meet....it's what I have to do...and I will not feel guilty for "spending the evening indoors, sleeping in our beds, wrapped in layers of blankets to protect our fragile bodies from the winter chill" I'm proud of what I have, and I have earned it!

I have a hard time reading this story based on Ruthie's 'unfortunate' situation. Yes I hate that anyone has to be out in this cold, and agree they should all have a place to stay warm at night, but I also know some choose this life, (read Ruthies blog, it's not just my opinion). Therefore some (not all) should also feel a bit of guilt when they start 'expecting' tax payers who work for their money to fund their lifestyle.

Ok, let the flogging begin ;)

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Siriunsun 4 years, 4 months ago

No flogging from me, Deanna. I had a bad experience with Ruthie, too. Ruthie gets very angry when families who have been faced with emergencies are sheltered, and placed as higher priorities than she is on waiting lists. But when a family with children has suddenly become homeless, and Ruthie has embraced the same difficulties year after year, refusing to better her own circumstances in any way or take any responsibility, it is time to bump her off the waiting lists. Especially when children need the beds and food that Ruthie wants to consume.

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nowhereman 4 years, 4 months ago

Benjamin Franklin wrote about how the native inhabitants of this land, who we and our forefathers in this country deemed savages, had a visitors tent in each village where travellers could come and stay. When the people of the village learned a stranger had come to the village everyone turned out to make sure that the visitor was comfortable and well fed, and it was considered the height of rudeness for the visitor to speak of or anyone to ask about the visitors business or intentions until after he had been fed and his needs and comforts were seen to. The woman in question is in her late 50s has a bad heart and walks with a limp. I don't know her entire story, but is she to be consigned to the cold because she is not grateful enough or because she doesn't have a child to care for? I am not trying to "flog" anyone, just raise a little awareness. Many unhoused folk are over 50 and/or battling a physical handicap or mental illness. Most are sleep deprived, because even in warm weather its illegal to sleep in a public place so they must be constantly on the move. Most have a poor diet, because they have to eat whatever someone gives them or they can buy, which is often junk food because they don't have anywhere to cook anything or any way of storing food, so a balanced nutrious diet is out of the question. They must deal with feelings of depression, lonliness and isolation that would send you or I scurrying to either the medicine cabinet or the liquor store. They are dirty because they have to choose between taking a shower (if they can find a place to do so) and putting dirty clothes back on or washing their clothes (if they can find a place to do so) and putting them on without getting clean first. They have to carry everything they have and walk everywhere they need to go, so everything they do is twice as hard and takes twice as long as it does you or I. Exactly how do you better yourself if you are old, dirty and disabled and lack the means to change any of those things? I am glad and grateful for everyone who tries to help another human being, be it with a bag of Mcdonalds food or letting them stay on your couch for a night. I encourage everyone to consider if there is anyway possible for you to volunteer at the Warming place or help out in someother way, and to be ready to be disappointed from time to time and still keep helping. People need it.

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