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Horse clinic will address de-spooking

SMOKE AND rustling plastic provide distractions for horses involved in a De-Spooking Clinic and Equine Confidence Course like the one scheduled for June 21 and 22 at the Fort Dalles Riders Arena in The Dalles.
Contributed photo

SMOKE AND rustling plastic provide distractions for horses involved in a De-Spooking Clinic and Equine Confidence Course like the one scheduled for June 21 and 22 at the Fort Dalles Riders Arena in The Dalles. Contributed photo

The Wasco County Sheriff’s Mounted Posse is bringing a De-spooking Clinic and Equine Confidence Course to The Dalles June 21 and 22.

Five openings are left in the two-day clinic at the Fort Dalles Rider’s Arena, 123 Irving St., The Dalles. The clinic offers police training for civilian show, trail and working horses, presented by the National Mounted Police Services.

Bill Richey, founder and director of National Mounted Police Services, Inc., is a POST certified mounted police instructor. He was instrumental in creating mounted units for the city of Duluth, Iowa, and Forsyth and Gilmer counties in Georgia, and training their officers and horses. He worked with Atlanta Police Mounted Unit in preparation for the 1996 Olympics and was also involved in reorganizing the unit.

The clinic will help riders:

• Understand the issue. This clinic will offer comprehensive understanding of the horse’s issues regarding spooking. Riders will learn why they spook, and more importantly, what they are thinking and what triggers their escape mechanisms.

• Know what to do about it. An understanding of what is happening will allow the rider to be trained to deal with not only the issues of the horse but other problems in the future with any horse. The clinic will teach how to build horse confidence in the rider and, most importantly, teach horse and rider to have trust in each other — all beginning with understanding.

“Think of it this way, if Arabs, thoroughbreds, warm-bloods, quarter horses, appaloosas, paints and all kinds of horses can be trained to be police horses, there is no reason your horse can’t be taught the same things,” course information states. “The fact is, training a horse to be ‘spook-proof’ is just another training method. Like all other training methods, it requires a working knowledge of techniques used in police training. And, like all training, with enough practice your horse will learn to trust you and go forward through whatever you tell them to go through with little or no resistance.”

Reservations and a deposit are required for riders. For costs, reservations and other details including stabling and lodging information, email Linda Wilson at Tazz4015@

hughes.net or call 541-298-1065.

Online:

www.fortdallesriders.com

www.mountedpolice.org

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