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History Mystery and Looking Back, Dec. 20

Dale Roberts of Maupin, Terray Harmon and Gary Conley all contributed to this report.
The image above was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle.
Casey Roberts worked at the plant as a teenager, and wrote: “The area in the photograph for the History Mystery looks very much like the dock at the west end of what was then the Stadelman Fruit Company packing house.  
“Today the packing house is at West First Street and Bargeway Road and is owned by The Dalles Cherry Growers.  
“The dock area was used for storing and repairing the used whiskey barrels that Stadelman Fruit Company purchased for use in making Maraschino cherries. I worked in that area for a couple of summers during high school in the mid 1950s. Mostly, I tightened up the hoops using cooperage tools so that the barrel staves were tight enough together to prevent, or at least minimize, leakage.  
“Once the bottom head was secured in the barrel and the hoops driven toward the center of the barrel to tighten the barrel for use, each barrel was filled with cherries and a dilute solution of sulfur dioxide in water which served to preserve and bleach the cherries. The barrel was then sealed as the top head was put in place and secured with a top hoop. 
“Later, the cherries would be immersed in the coloring and syrup which turned them into Maraschino cherries.  
“During the mid 1950s, George Stadelman, Jr., was, I believe, a student at the University of Oregon at the time and during the summers worked in the packing house run by his father. I worked under a man named Jim Goff.  
“I don't recall the east side of the roof being open, so I assume that either part of the roof was blown off or, less likely, this was when the roof was being installed.  
“Inside the packing house were several conveyors loaded with fresh fruit (cherries for most of the year), alongside of which women (I don't recall any men) would pick individual cherries and hand pack them into boxes for shipping.”
Gary Conley added it must have been “One heck of a windstorm, one that ripped the roof off and made a real mess.”

The Dalles Chronicle
Dale Roberts of Maupin, Terray Harmon and Gary Conley all contributed to this report. The image above was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Casey Roberts worked at the plant as a teenager, and wrote: “The area in the photograph for the History Mystery looks very much like the dock at the west end of what was then the Stadelman Fruit Company packing house. “Today the packing house is at West First Street and Bargeway Road and is owned by The Dalles Cherry Growers. “The dock area was used for storing and repairing the used whiskey barrels that Stadelman Fruit Company purchased for use in making Maraschino cherries. I worked in that area for a couple of summers during high school in the mid 1950s. Mostly, I tightened up the hoops using cooperage tools so that the barrel staves were tight enough together to prevent, or at least minimize, leakage. “Once the bottom head was secured in the barrel and the hoops driven toward the center of the barrel to tighten the barrel for use, each barrel was filled with cherries and a dilute solution of sulfur dioxide in water which served to preserve and bleach the cherries. The barrel was then sealed as the top head was put in place and secured with a top hoop. “Later, the cherries would be immersed in the coloring and syrup which turned them into Maraschino cherries. “During the mid 1950s, George Stadelman, Jr., was, I believe, a student at the University of Oregon at the time and during the summers worked in the packing house run by his father. I worked under a man named Jim Goff. “I don't recall the east side of the roof being open, so I assume that either part of the roof was blown off or, less likely, this was when the roof was being installed. “Inside the packing house were several conveyors loaded with fresh fruit (cherries for most of the year), alongside of which women (I don't recall any men) would pick individual cherries and hand pack them into boxes for shipping.” Gary Conley added it must have been “One heck of a windstorm, one that ripped the roof off and made a real mess.”



photo

Robbie Anderson, Lucile A. Stephens, Lee Langston. Terray Harmon, Dale Roberts, Gary Conley and Dan Meader all contributed to this report. Unlike most History Mystery photos, the Chronicle does not have a clear answer to the mystery question: The negative, a 4 by 5-inch black and white, is labeled simply “City Streets, Copy of Color, July 1962.” It is clearly a view of Highway 30 through downtown The Dalles, looking west from the Brewery Grade. Guesses ranged from the late 1950s to the early 1960s. Dan Meader wrote that it was likely taken in 1960 or 1961. “The white car in front of the Standard Station is a 1958 Chevy, it belonged to a classmate, Fred Smith. Fred worked at the station. The photo was on a placemat available locally for a number of years. “And for what it’s worth, I worked at the station the summer of 1962.” Terray Harmon said that he worked at the Economy Market in the late 1960s, but thought the photo was taken in the late 1950s. Gary Conley thought it was in the 1960s, and noticed a truck loaded with cherries being trucked through town. Lucille A. Stephens noticed the academy next to what is now Old St. Peters Landmark, where she went to school from 1941 through 1946.

December 20

20 Years Ago-1995

Northern Wasco County PUD”s administration has begun a new search for land on which to build office and pole yard facilities. “We have started a survey of the city for other suitable sites,” said Sherril Anderson, PUD community relations manager. The move comes about a month after the PUD released its option on a potential building site on Port of The Dalles property. The PUD had looked at the property for more than one year.

The Northern Wasco County Parks and Recreation District is sponsoring a winter survival course. The class is open to people age 12 and up and will be offered on two consecutive, beginning Saturdays in the Civic Auditorium Fireside room. The clinic will help individuals learn how to be better prepared for winter and how to deal with difficult situations such as hypothermia, frost bite and avalanches. Instructions will be given by staff members of the Forest Service.

40 Years Ago-1975

The United Way goal reached the $45,000.00 mark Thursday, Mike Hammerschmith, president of Wasco County United Way Board said. In a special meeting of the board, Hammerschmith pointed out the need for volunteer workers who have not turned in pledge cards to do so before Dec. 24. “If this is accomplished the goal could reach the $50,000 mark<” he said. Hamerschmith also announced that a special clean up drive will take place after the first of the year. This drive is to cover several hundred small businesses of the area that were not contacted.

When a milk truck missed a turn in a driveway this morning and stopped stuck in the yard of the Dr. N.K. Dey residence, a 9-year-old news reporter went to work. Susan Schon called to tell the Chronicle a milk truck was stuck. She was calm and answered questions firmly. Three hours later, Mrs. Dey reported the truck was out. She said driver Marvin Ross reported ice, snow, a brake problem, all combined to get him off the Dr. Jim Minnick driveway into her yard.

60 Years Ago-1955

Baxco Corporation’s plants at The Dalles and elsewhere have been merged with J.H. Baxter & Company of Portland under the Baxter name effective the first of the year, according to R.A. Johnson, superintendent of The Dalles plant. The Baxter Company today announced merger of its associated companies and election of new officers of the consolidated firm. The merger makes it one of the West’s largest producers of pressure treated forest products.

Last call is being issued today for entries in the holiday decorations contest being sponsored this year by The Dalles Chronicle. Three $25 U.S. Savings Bonds are being provided by The Chronicle for contest prizes. Competition is divided into residential and commercial categories.

80 Years Ago-1935

One trainman was killed and two suffered serious injuries at 11 o’clock last night when an east bound S.P. & S. freight train struck four freight cars being pulled onto a siding at Lyle. The engine of the freight train overturned after striking the cars, which were from the Goldendale branch and were being backed onto the siding to permit the Bend train to pass.

The city council at a special meeting last night approved application to the federal works progress administration for a $7,027 sidewalk repair project, and ordered necessary forms sent to W.M. Bartlett, WPA engineer at Bend. Although as yet no formal allocation of funds to the project has been made, city officials have been informed federal money to finance the work can be had without difficulty.

100 Years Ago-1915

The household arts department of the local high school will offer a short course to any one desiring to take advantage of the same. The course will extend during a period of six weeks and meetings will be held twice a week. The following subjects in domestic science will be given: three lessons in bread making, three lessons in deserts, two lessons in salads, three lessons in preparation of meals and one lesson in household sanitation.

With 20 candidates making themselves conspicuous by riding in cages, on hobby-horses, dancing around in barrels, and doing many other stunts because they were compelled to do so, the local lodge of Elks paraded the streets of the business section of the city Saturday night. The occasion for the celebration was a special meeting for the purpose of initiating the big class of candidates into The Dalles lodge.



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