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Looking back from July 5.

A bit of confusion in regards to the Safeway History Mystery, above. Last week, Mark Riter noted that first Safeway store was located where Grinders is today, not at the back of the lot, and his information is correct. 
However, the printed correction referenced the photo above as being the first Safeway. It is not —  it is the second Safeway, and the building now houses True Value. 
So everyone was correct — except the History Mystery writer.
If you have additional information, or a clarification, in regads to a recent History Mystery, please contact Mark Gibson, 541-506-4601 or email mgibson @thedalleschronicle.com. The information will be included in this column as space allows, along with the photograph being referenced.
Thanks to all those who called to clarify the Safeway issue, and the many readers who share their stories and memories for use in this column.
	— Mark Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle


A bit of confusion in regards to the Safeway History Mystery, above. Last week, Mark Riter noted that first Safeway store was located where Grinders is today, not at the back of the lot, and his information is correct. However, the printed correction referenced the photo above as being the first Safeway. It is not — it is the second Safeway, and the building now houses True Value. So everyone was correct — except the History Mystery writer. If you have additional information, or a clarification, in regads to a recent History Mystery, please contact Mark Gibson, 541-506-4601 or email mgibson @thedalleschronicle.com. The information will be included in this column as space allows, along with the photograph being referenced. Thanks to all those who called to clarify the Safeway issue, and the many readers who share their stories and memories for use in this column. — Mark Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle



photo

A number of people recognized this view of downtown The Dalles, including Mary Batty, Jake Grossmiller, Gary Conley, Bill Johnson, Lee Langston, Lucile Stephens, Jim Lobdell, Virginia Harwood, Carolyn Homer, Owen Smith, Edward Smith and Russ Brown. The photograph was taken in November of 1948 and scanned from a 4 by 5 inch negative found in the archives of the Chronicle. Jake Grossmiller wrote: “The History Mystery for this week is a shot taken on Brewery Grade looking west down second street. The building on the left bottom is the old Great Southern Railroad Depot, now Cannon Packer. “The picture is late 40’s and the Depot then was a Drive-In Resturant. Later it was used as a prep kitchen by Tom Foley for the Hand-Out. My mother worked in the front part, as it was the office for Farm Chemical Fertilizers owned then by Stan Mayfield. “The next little building to the west was Maier’s Market. “There was a railroad spur that ran next to the Sunshine Mill, diagonally across second street behind the Chevron Service Station, the little white building just west of Maier’s Market, then west past what is now Dintys Market, across Monroe Street and behind The Dalles Iron Works. The spur then terminated at the Kerr Gifford Elevator (Hughes Feed and Grain.) “Dominos was in the old Tum-A-Lum Lumber building and across the street and to the east was E.B.Young Sporting Goods. Where Precision Auto is now was a Texaco Service Station.” At the time of the picture, Second Street was a two-way street and also Highway 30. Owen Smith remembered there being an ice cream shop in the Great Southern Railroad Depot/Canon Packer building, where Russ Brown also remembers being taken out to as a kid. Mary Batty noted the mill was Sunshine Bisquit, and thanked the Chronicle for running old photographs from the past. You are welcome!

July 5

20 Years Ago-1995

City negotiators will ask the Dalles City Council next Monday if they should continue talks to move the police department across the street into the PUD building. A dollar figure was mentioned for the purchase of the 11,173 square-foot PUD building-half of which is parking-The Dalles City Attorney Gene Parker said, but he would not comment on the figure itself or his reaction to it.

The trial of two former Rajneeshee leaders on charges they plotted to kill Oregon’s U.S. attorney began today with the prosecutor calling it “a classic case of human frailty and corruption, the arrogance of power and the manipulation of the devoted.” Sally-Anne Croft and Susan Hagan were known as Ma Prem Savita and Ma Anand Su in their days at the Rajneeshpuram commune in north central Oregon in the early 1980s. The commune was established by Rajneesh, an Indian guru, who moved to Oregon in 1981.

40 Years Ago-1975

The Learning House, the alternate school project in The Dalles, has set up operation in the PP&L building in the downtown area and already has several students under contract. The project proposal was initiated for funding by District 12 schools, and is 100 percent funded by the Title I program through the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. It was set up to provide school for students who have dropped out of regular schools and has the function of helping these students get back into school, or in lieu of that, assisting them in taking and passing the GED tests, the equivalent to a high school diploma, Wagner said.

J.H. Baxter and Co. has announced that its plant manager here, Robert A Sexton, will transfer to Eugene and that treatment supervisor Bob Clawson will become manager. The Dalles plant specializes in treating cross ties for the Union Pacific Railroad, owner of the plant, which is leased to Baxter, the operator. “Our sales organization is predicting an upturn this fall in our business, based largely on expectations that the power companies will be spending again to build line,” Sexton said.

60 Years Ago-1955

One of the big reasons why Clifford’s Barbecue waltzed through the first half schedule of the City Softball Association league with a clean record was the heavy hitting lineup that wore the green and white. Bob Clements, catcher for the first half titlists, carried a .429 average through the five-game schedule and was a key factor in the Clifford games.

Day Camp, the organized playground activity in the city, scheduled to begin Tuesday, July 5, E. A. (Swede) Scholer recreation director announces. Cost of the camp will be 25 cents per person for the summer to help defray the cost of supplies. The program is open to children between the ages of 6 and 12. The daily program will include crafts, games, special events and stories.

80 Years Ago-1935

The Dalles three-day celebration of national Independence day ended at midnight last night in a whirlwind finish which saw the downtown streets still packed with one of the biggest crowds ever to attend a similar event in this city. From the opening Indian pow-wow at 7:30 Wednesday night at Amotan field until the good night dances at the auditorium and Olde Mill pavilion last night, the city was a sea of humanity, surging in waves from one attraction to another, and taking time in between for hasty lunches and for attendance at the local theaters.

A runaway team of horses provided street crowds gathered for yesterday morning’s Fourth of July parade a thrilling and spectacular feature that ended fortunately with nobody hurt. Floyd Daniels, Fifteen Mile rancher, was driving a four-horse team hitched to a hay wagon down east Second Street, when the report of a bomb or firecracker set off by some unidentified person frightened the horses into the runaway.

100 Years Ago-1915

The Dalles baseball team went to the little town of Antelope last week to wage three diamond engagements with the team of the southern Wasco County city, and ran up against a great aggregation of baseball stars from the Oregon Agricultural College and the Portland City league.

The largest crowd that ever enjoyed a Chautauqua program in The Dalles was delighted with the wonderful music which was offered last night by the Il Trovatore Grand Opera company and Ciricillo’s Italian band. Ciricillo is one of the most successful of all band conductors. He is a musical genius of the highest order. His organization is composed of real musicians; everyone is an artist.



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