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History mystery/Looking back

Irene Sullenger correctly identified this photograph as “15-mile creek, about gone dry.” Dale Roberts and Lee Langston also guessed as to the location of this History Mystery.
The undated photograph was scanned from a 4 by 5 inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Fifteen Mile Creek (with Paul Weigelt) after improvements made. Published Sept. 19, 1947.
The published photo appeared in The Dalles Optimist Friday, Sept. 19, 1947 on an inside page under the headline “New fishway blasted on Fifeteen Mile Creek.” The caption read “Dynamiting of a fishway at Cushing Falls, near the lower end of Fifteen Mile Creek, about a mile above the Seufert Brothers canning plant, by the state game commission, will permit migratory fish to ascend the stream during high water in the spring and greatly improve fishing in the Dufur area, believes Paul Weigelt, sportsman, and longtime active member of the Rod and Gun club. The water will come down this fishway now instead of going over the sheer rock ledge at left, as formerly. Optimist Photo.”

Irene Sullenger correctly identified this photograph as “15-mile creek, about gone dry.” Dale Roberts and Lee Langston also guessed as to the location of this History Mystery. The undated photograph was scanned from a 4 by 5 inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Fifteen Mile Creek (with Paul Weigelt) after improvements made. Published Sept. 19, 1947. The published photo appeared in The Dalles Optimist Friday, Sept. 19, 1947 on an inside page under the headline “New fishway blasted on Fifeteen Mile Creek.” The caption read “Dynamiting of a fishway at Cushing Falls, near the lower end of Fifteen Mile Creek, about a mile above the Seufert Brothers canning plant, by the state game commission, will permit migratory fish to ascend the stream during high water in the spring and greatly improve fishing in the Dufur area, believes Paul Weigelt, sportsman, and longtime active member of the Rod and Gun club. The water will come down this fishway now instead of going over the sheer rock ledge at left, as formerly. Optimist Photo.” The Dalles Chronicle

photo

A bit of confusion in regards to the Safeway History Mystery, above. Last week, Mark Riter noted that first Safeway store was located where Grinders is today, not at the back of the lot, and his information is correct. However, the printed correction referenced the photo above as being the first Safeway. It is not — it is the second Safeway, and the building now houses True Value. So everyone was correct — except the History Mystery writer. If you have additional information, or a clarification, in regads to a recent History Mystery, please contact Mark Gibson, 541-506-4601 or email mgibson @thedalleschronicle.com. The information will be included in this column as space allows, along with the photograph being referenced. Thanks to all those who called to clarify the Safeway issue, and the many readers who share their stories and memories for use in this column. — Mark Gibson/The Dalles Chronicle

July 26

20 Years Ago-1995

The mothballed Joseph G. Wilson Elementary School could be a police/fire station, offices, or home to a charter school to attract new students. “Because our whole rationale for closing the school was to save money, I wouldn’t support reopening it unless it was self-supporting,” said Jim Boston a District 12 board member.

Twenty hours and 52 miles later, Steve Finston was nursing the aches and pains from a walk that can only be called a success. Finston’s walk for HOPE (housing for people) of Wasco County began Friday night at the Hood River Bridge toll booth and ended Saturday evening 5,200 feet higher, and 20 hours and seven minutes later just 1-1/2 miles short of his goal. Finston had planned to walk 54 miles to Timberline Lodge, but after climbing the full elevation of his walk and beginning the downhill home stretch his body gave him a clear message: Stop.

40 Years Ago-1975

The latest chapter in the Sasquatch saga may be written today when Peter Byrne, director of the Bigfoot Information Center in The Dalles, casts a footprint of a “creature” sighted in the Tygh Valley area two weeks ago. Byrne told The Chronicle this morning that he visited the Tygh Valley site Friday and saw a “very shallow footprint, with three toe-prints,” which was “about 15 inches long.” The reported sighting which prompted Byrne’s interest was made two weeks ago by Bob Bellamy Jr., of The Dalles, his wife, a Richland, Washington couple and several children.

An auto rally to raise funds for the Multiple Sclerosis Fund is set for Aug. 17 with The Dalles Area Jaycees as sponsors. The rally is not a race, but a navigation test over a 40 mile route, said Dave Lutgen, Jaycee.

60 Years Ago-1955

Noel Neal, member of The Dalles High School FFA chapter and son of Mr. and Mrs. Marion Neal, has been named district winner of the Future Farmers Better Farming contest sponsored by Oregon Kiwanis clubs. In winning first place Noel scored 91 of a possible 100 points based upon excellence of work in the supervised farming projects of his vocational agriculture work at The Dalles High School.

The Senate today approved a Department of Interior supplemental appropriations bill providing $2,038,000 for construction of power facilities to serve the proposed Harvey Aluminum Co. plant at The Dalles, Sen. Richard Neuberger’s office informed The Chronicle. The bill now goes to a Senate-House conference to resolve differences in several other items. Under the provisions of the bill, funds would be made available for construction of the power line and other installations as soon as the government receives assurance that Harvey intends to proceed with the plant.

80 Years Ago-1935

The first dividend of the First Federal Savings & Loan association of The Dalles has been declared and is now being distributed among shareholders of the institution—organized only a year ago. Officials of the city’s youngest financial institution declared today that the declaration of the dividend, amounting to three per cent, marked a successful beginning year for the association, which is looking forward to opening an office of its own as soon as earnings are large enough to support a “home.”

Damages totaling $21,038 are asked in a suit filed in circuit court today by Arthur B. Hedges against the Pacific Truck Express Company, and Wilfred A. Ruby. The case is an outgrowth of a highway collision which took place just east of Mosier on April 30 last, between Hedges’ car and one of the defendant company’s trucks, driven by Ruby. Hedges alleged in his complaint that he suffered painful and permanent injuries in the accident to his chest, his left knee, his supra-orbital nerve, and a variety of severe bruises, rib fractures and severe nervous shock.

100 Years Ago-1915

Dr. Ray Palmer, evangelist, former pastor of the Second Baptist Church in Portland and the man who dedicated the Baptist church of The Dalles 15 years ago, addressed a large audience last night at the union church meeting, which was held in the Union Street city park. Dr. Palmer chose as his subject, “The Wonderful Book, the Bible.” He told the story of the Bible from its origin to the present day. His lecture was of interesting historical significance. W. U. Foster was the soloist of the evening.

The water commission made its annual inspection yesterday of the city’s water sources and properties in the heart of the Cascades at the “Meadows.” The members on the trip were Commissioners Hudson, Maier, Bonn, Hansen and Rorick, being accompanied by Assistant Superintendent Borders, J. W. Crum, who has charge of the field work, and Councilman Ed Ball.

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