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Looking back on Sept. 6

A number of people provided information about last week’s History Mystery, above, including Mareta Maier, John Foley and Aggie Brown of Tygh Valley.
The photograph was scanned from a print submitted by Maier, and was taken July 4, 1957. 
She said this is a photo of her brother, G.K. Hendricks, who won this 1957 Plymouth Fury by purchasing a 50 cent “coin” for a drawing held at a Fourth of July weekend celebration during Oregon’s centennial year. 
He was visiting his sister while on leave from his duties with the U.S. Air Force in Moses Lake, Wash. He bought the winning ticket in a fundraiser to get grass planted in Sorosis Park, which was bare dirt at that time. 
Maier said she did not go to Sororis Park for the drawing because it was over 100 degrees and she was pregnant but, after seeing her brother’s new car, she wished that she had. “I’ve never seen anyone so lucky in all my life,” she told Hendricks when she saw his new ride.
The home in the background is located in the 300 block of West 21st St. in The Dalles. Foley said the car giveaway was through a Plymouth and Desoto dealer located where NAPA Auto is today.

A number of people provided information about last week’s History Mystery, above, including Mareta Maier, John Foley and Aggie Brown of Tygh Valley. The photograph was scanned from a print submitted by Maier, and was taken July 4, 1957. She said this is a photo of her brother, G.K. Hendricks, who won this 1957 Plymouth Fury by purchasing a 50 cent “coin” for a drawing held at a Fourth of July weekend celebration during Oregon’s centennial year. He was visiting his sister while on leave from his duties with the U.S. Air Force in Moses Lake, Wash. He bought the winning ticket in a fundraiser to get grass planted in Sorosis Park, which was bare dirt at that time. Maier said she did not go to Sororis Park for the drawing because it was over 100 degrees and she was pregnant but, after seeing her brother’s new car, she wished that she had. “I’ve never seen anyone so lucky in all my life,” she told Hendricks when she saw his new ride. The home in the background is located in the 300 block of West 21st St. in The Dalles. Foley said the car giveaway was through a Plymouth and Desoto dealer located where NAPA Auto is today.

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Terray Harmon, Russ Brown, Donna H., Nancy B., Dale and Becky Roberts of Maupin, Lucile Stephens of Dufur, Gary Conley and Johna Ward all contributed to the information gathered about Helzer’s Diner in The Dalles, above. The photograph was scanned from a collection of negatives labeled "restaurants" from the archives of The Dalles Optimist, which later became The Dalles Chronicle. It was scanned from a 5 by 7 inch black and white film dated July 12, 1957. The newspapers displayed on racks to the left of the proprietor are, left to right, The Dalles Optimist and the Oregonian. Behind the window is a rack of "HOW TO BOOKS" and shelves of magazines. In the newspaper racks to the right of the proprietor, enlargement shows the Seattle Post Intelligencer and The New York Mirror, and a Sunday paper wrapped in color comics, with Dick Tracy visible. Behind the window a rack of greeting cards, one end of the lunch counter and a man smoking are visible. Helzer’s Café was located at 311 E. 2nd Street, where Greater Oregon Behavioral Health is now, said Johna Ward. The Cafe may have been open all night, certainly very early and very late. There were restrooms and a shoe-shine service accessed from the alley behind, which served as a bus depot for Greyhound and Trailway buses. Lucile Stephens said she remembered the café well: “Mother would put me on the bus there to go to her friend’s home in Washington,” she said. Buses came to the alley behind the store, and tickets were purchased inside the café. “It was a busy place there for years,” remembers Gary Conley. Helzers Café Jake Grossmiller wrote: The description of Helzers Café (last week, corrected) was by and large correct with a few exceptions. The bathrooms were in the basement, not the Shoe Shine stand. The stand was located in the back of the building and was manned by Percy Viltz. There were storage lockers across from Percy’s Stand that could be rented for a quarter. The cashier’s stand was located across from the lunch counter and was manned by my Aunt Helen Slusher-Grossmiller, and had shelves with trinkets and souvenirs of The Dalles.

September 6

20 Years Ago-1995

Northern Wasco County PUD plans to sell $12 million in tax-exempt revenue bonds early next week to finance its half of the McNary Dam hydro plant. Bonds will be available in increments of $5,000 and some mature each year from 1998 through 2022 at interest rates around 5 to 6 percent. “In the past PUD bonds have been very popular because they are exempt from both federal and state taxes,” according to PUD Accounting and Finance Manager Jim Johnson. He expects that these bonds will also sell quickly.

The newest private school in The Dalles opened this morning and is already looking ahead to next year when it hopes to be even bigger. The Dalles Secondary School will have grades six to eight this year in the First Church of God Church building at 2308 E 12th Street. There is room for 60 to 80 students in the school and Principal/Administrator Billie Beery, who decline to give and enrollment figures prior to the opening of school, said there were still openings. Next year, grades nine to 12 will be added.

40 Years Ago-1975

The Dalles High Crimson and Gray Show Band may go back to Disneyland next spring for a Bicentennial festival. Band Director Dick Dorr and the band presented a preview during the Crimson and Gray game at Amotan Field last night, and then announced the invitation. In addition, the Jazz Ensemble has been asked to perform in demonstration sessions for the Oregon Music Educators Conference Nov. 29 in Portland. The ensemble is in its fifth year. It will also perform at Disneyland in the America on Parade Pageant. The ensemble will play on a Sunday afternoon in Carnation Plaza.

A man police said they found hiding inside a local tire firm warehouse has been charged with second degree burglary and is lodged in the Wasco County Jail. A search of the inside of the Woolsey Tire building was started after officers found an area in the loading dock where boards covering a chute going to the basement had been pried away.

60 Years Ago-1955

A ranch hand is in the hospital at Prineville with a gunshot wound and a bartender is in the Wasco County jail following a barroom brawl which occurred Saturday night in Antelope. Police say Edgar William Norris, a part-time bartender, has admitted firing the shot which struck Archie Smith, a ranch worker from the Antelope area, in the left side of the chest. Norris, according to reports received this morning, was attempting to break up a brawl in the tavern when he fired several shots.

The Dalles city natatorium closed for the year yesterday after recording an attendance mark of 30,904 for the months of May, June, July, August and five days of September. Attendance increased sharply over the Labor Day weekend because of 100 degree or hotter weather.

80 Years Ago-1935

Retail gasoline prices were cut from two to two-and-a-half cents at The Dalles today by six of the major oil companies-Associated, Standard, Shell, Union, General Petroleum and Richfield. Shell, Union and General made the two-and-a-half cent cut on ethyl and second structure gasolines, dropping the price to 22 and 20 cents.

When the Wasco County grand jury convenes in special session on Monday it will have before it more criminal cases than any jury has had to deal with during the last several years, it was indicated at the office of T. Leland Brown, district attorney, today. Brown has listed a total of eight cases for presentation to the jury, his office reported. Topping the list is the manslaughter caser growing out of the fatal during here last month of Olaf Nelson, Oakridge Ore., veteran, as the result of an alleged “prank” charged to John A. Moore, of Condon, who is accused of touching a lighted match to a hula skirt Nelson was wearing.

100 Years Ago-1915

“The new federal building will be large enough to accommodate a city of 10,000 inhabitants,” said Frank W. Pease, superintendent of construction of the work on the government building, in speaking today, about the plans for the structure. “Every piece of furniture and every bit of work that is being done on the building is up to standard. The building will cost approximately $80,000. It will be one of which the city may be justly proud.

With the opening of school comes a few restrictions that are considered genuine nuisances by the young American element of the city. Chief of Police Kurtz has announced that the curfew ordinance will be strictly enforced during the coming months. Hereafter children who are subject to the curfew law must be off the streets when the curfew rings. If parents wish their children to attend motion picture shows they must attend the first performance and be at home before 9 o’clock, unless they are accompanied by a chaperone.

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