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Looking back on Sept. 27

Lee Langston of Sherman County contributed to this week’s report.
The History Mystery picture above was scanned from a 4 by 5 inch black and white negative from the archives of the Chronicle and Optimist. The negative envelope reads “Cub Pack, Jos. G. Wilson, Dec. 18, 1948.
The photograph was published in the Optimist Friday, Dec. 24, 1948. The cutline or caption read, in part, “Embarked on a drive for the next few weeks to collect old license plates from cars, to be turned in for their salvage value, are these members of Cub Scout Pack No. 580, Joseph G. Wilson school. Funds for handicraft materials, badges and achievement awards will be provided by this program, in which the boys will be paid for all plates turned in at the county clerk's office, the drivers' license office in the city hall and at garages. About 42 boys are registered cubs.”
Last names of the boys included Clayton, Davis, Wiley, Schoenhaven, Hamilton, Flaman, Reed, Fillpot, Day, Haynes, Huskey, Tidyman, Hollingsworth, Statton, Duncan, Hayner, Reynolds, Forrstrom, Hill, Stewart, Olsen, Creighton and Ferguson.

Lee Langston of Sherman County contributed to this week’s report. The History Mystery picture above was scanned from a 4 by 5 inch black and white negative from the archives of the Chronicle and Optimist. The negative envelope reads “Cub Pack, Jos. G. Wilson, Dec. 18, 1948. The photograph was published in the Optimist Friday, Dec. 24, 1948. The cutline or caption read, in part, “Embarked on a drive for the next few weeks to collect old license plates from cars, to be turned in for their salvage value, are these members of Cub Scout Pack No. 580, Joseph G. Wilson school. Funds for handicraft materials, badges and achievement awards will be provided by this program, in which the boys will be paid for all plates turned in at the county clerk's office, the drivers' license office in the city hall and at garages. About 42 boys are registered cubs.” Last names of the boys included Clayton, Davis, Wiley, Schoenhaven, Hamilton, Flaman, Reed, Fillpot, Day, Haynes, Huskey, Tidyman, Hollingsworth, Statton, Duncan, Hayner, Reynolds, Forrstrom, Hill, Stewart, Olsen, Creighton and Ferguson.

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No one ventured a guess about last week’s History Mystery photo, above. The photograph was taken March 17, 1964, for The Dalles Optimist. An estimated 50 men were “on feed lot at the ranch near Maupin of Raymond Crabtree, a pioneer in development of farm feed lots in Wasco County, as crowd gathered at the ranch for a feed lot inspection tour.” John K. Fizzell acted as tour director. “Feeding of livestock in farm feed lots is a growing industry in the county which is receiving strong support from such men as Crabtree,” the Optimist reported.

September 27

20 Years Ago-1995

There will be a little more money in the 1995-96 school year budget than the Chenowith School board had anticipated, but the decision on how it will be spent already has been made. The extra money, about $260,000, comes from state lottery funds that were part of a $290,000 grant to remodel the district administration building into classrooms for the Chenowith Learning Center. It is the D-9 alternative education program. Initially, it was though that all of that grant had to be spent before the end of June this year. Bids on the remodeling job came in later than anticipated and that threw the schedule off and most of the work was not done until this summer, Supt. Jim Kiefert said.

The Dalles City Council has plotted – sort of – a course on how they will reach a decision on what the water rates in the city will be in the future. The council, serving as the body that will plot that course instead of a committee that had been proposed earlier, met for the first time on Tuesday night at the Mid-Columbia Senior Center. Only the last few minutes of the meeting were spent on discussing any suggestions of how the new system of rates might work.

40 Years Ago-1975

All four high schools in this county will host visitations by representatives from the Oregon State System of High Education during October. The Dalles will be host on Oct. 13, Wahtonka the following day, Dufur and Wasco Union will be the hosts on Oct. 16. Unique throughout the United States is a visitation by representatives of the Oregon State System of Higher Education to every high school in the state. The team impresses upon secondary students the need for some type of education or training beyond high school. The visitation supplements the guidance program of county high schools. Students will be given firsthand information about course offerings, admission requirements, housing, costs to attend, financial aids and scholarships and other information pertinent to planning for the college experience.

A nationwide Consumer Service Program designed to improve and broaden the quality of mail service was announced today by Postmaster Del Binder. Beginning Oct. 1, the U.S. Postal Service will introduce a program at The Dalles Post Office and other offices across the nation to encourage mail users to register problems they may have with their mail service. At the core of the program is a consumer service card, through which problems are identified and which postal managers attempt to expeditiously resolve.

60 Years Ago-1955

A report on the shortage in Dalles City funds was one of the items considered by the Wasco County grand jury during its first session yesterday. Since the city audit has not been completed, the matter was continued. In its report, the Grand Jury recommended that the name of the Wasco County Hospital or Poor Farm be changed. It also recommended possibly converting the lower floor of the institution into a nursing home.

Dalles Jaycees were applauded for their accomplishments during their first year of operation by Ivan Congleton of Portland, state president of Oregon Junior Chambers of Commerce, who spoke at Monday’s luncheon meeting at Langdon’s. The local organization also was complimented by Congleton for the favorable reputation it has gained already throughout the state.

80 Years Ago-1935

A word of cheer for persons of the community interested in seeing the requested $106,000 PWA grant of the Port of The Dalles commission approved was offered last night by Harold L. Eddins, president of the Dalles chamber of commerce, and W. S. Nelson, manager. Recounting the results of a conference at Salem Tuesday with Senator Charles L. McNary, the two chamber officials told directors of their organization and members of the Port of The Dalles commission that McNary was very definite in his assurance that people of The Dalles “had nothing to worry about” in regards to the much-desired grant.

Wasco County grangers are attempting to “trade” the $165,000 Big Eddy overhead crossing project, already approved by the state highway commission, for improvements to some 73 miles of county roads used as rural mail and school bus routes, it was revealed today in a formal report the Wasco County granges road committee released for publication. The report, signed by Roy Johnson, general chairman of the committee and William H. McNeal, acting secretary, declared the Big Eddy crossing job “was not needed, had not been asked for and was not wanted by the county.”

100 Years Ago-1915

Ida Fostnot, aged 18, wants a place to work for her board during the school year. Ida lives with her parents on a ranch near The Dalles. The dream of her life has been to attend high school. She planned and wished and prayed that her dream might be realized. Ida has enrolled as a freshman in the local high school and she is supremely happy. Studious, steady, eager and anxious to advance mentally and physically, Ida is intensely interested in the various departments of the high school. She says she will work hard this winter in order to stay in town, but unless she finds a place where she can attend school and work for her board and room, she will have to return to the country.

Congressman N. J. Sinnott returned to his home in The Dalles last night. With the exception of an over-night visit here, the representative was away from The Dalles more than six weeks, touring his congressional district by automobile in order to study the conditions and needs of all parts of the district. He secured first-hand information from all classes of his constituents, that he may better represent them at the national capital.

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