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Looking Back on December 4, 2016

No one provided information on last week’s History Mystery, above, scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads, “Soda Works, The Dalles, Copy - old picture. Aug. 27, 1956.” The date is when the copy was made; the original print is labeled 1911. 
The same print is online at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center. The caption reads, “John Rose Soda Works, 610 E. 2nd Street in 1911. L to R: Blaser on soda wagon; Soda Water Bill; Charlie Borders; John Rose; Tony Paulson.”


No one provided information on last week’s History Mystery, above, scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Information on the envelope reads, “Soda Works, The Dalles, Copy - old picture. Aug. 27, 1956.” The date is when the copy was made; the original print is labeled 1911. The same print is online at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center. The caption reads, “John Rose Soda Works, 610 E. 2nd Street in 1911. L to R: Blaser on soda wagon; Soda Water Bill; Charlie Borders; John Rose; Tony Paulson.”



photo

Russ Brown, Terray Harmon, Bonita Ross, Phil Hammond, Gary Conley, Laura Comini, Mark Ulrich, Mary Batty, Jerry Phillips, Gary Rains and Linda Piles all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery was taken July 12, 1957, for The Dalles Chronicle. It shows the entrance to the coffeeshop in the half-basement of The Dalles Hotel, once located at the corner of Second and Lincoln. “It was a great place to have breakfast and coffee,” said Russ Brown. Laura Comini also said she met friends there every morning on her breaks. “They had nice waitreses and good coffee,” she said. Phil Hammond, a former resident of The Dalles, told Terray Harmon that early in his career, when he was driving on tours, Elvis Presley stayed at the hotel. Several responses were missed last week in regards to the Hotel Dalles photograph, pictured above. Jerry Phillips wrote, “The latest photo is the entrance to Hotel Dalles dining room which was in the basement. It was an especially great place to go for Sunday dinner for a kid like me.” Lynda Pyles noted that the coffee shop served meals and “my parents and I enjoyed eating there many times. Miss it!” Phillips and Gary Rains both noted that the name of the area home featured in a previous mystery was the Ed Pease house, not “Peace.” Rains added that “The Craig Office Supply Bldg now occupied by Mid-Columbia Medical Center and Adams Design at Second and Federal was originally a Pease & Mayes store.”

20 years ago – 1996

Somewhere out there is the person who will research the historic attire that interpreters will wear at the Crate’s Point Complex. Officials are seeking a key volunteer to serve as costume coordinator for the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Wasco County Historical Museum, collectively called the Crate’s Point Complex, which will open May 24, 1997. The job entails researching what people wore, from 1800s fur trappers to 1920s motorists, and then finding out how to buy or make those costumes.

About a dozen The Dalles School District employees, students, and board members spent their day Tuesday sharing their ideas on how a new middle school should be designed. The lengthy session was coordinated by representative of BOORA Architects, which have been hired to design the school.

40 years ago – 1976

Hey kids; the city will block off some streets for sledding as soon as weather conditions permit. Here’s the setup: H Street between 17th and 12th Streets, Oregon Street between 15th and 12th Streets. The hours will be: weekdays 4-9:30 p.m., weekends, 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Parks director Tom Ward urged parents to assist with supervision and see that their children use only these streets. It’s a safe way to play.

60 years ago – 1956

Accused arsonist Mrs. Carrol Jean Olson is scheduled to appear before Circuit Court Judge Malcolm Wilkinson this afternoon following her indictment on first degree arson charges.

The city council turned down the proposal of the Wasco County Tuberculosis and Health Association to make chest X-rays compulsory for all food handlers. Dr. John Sirving, head of the city council’s public health committee, said that a letter from the State Board of Health stated that it does not require food handlers to be X-rayed.

Brief snow flurries and a thin coat of ice on pavement at higher elevations in the city provided a hint of the wintry weather the forecasters say is in store.

80 years ago – 1936

Disappointed because Governor Charles H. Martin, due to illness, was unable to attend a community dinner held in his honor at Hotel Dalles this night, approximately 90 persons assembled for the function heard the governor’s scheduled address delivered by proxy in the person of Dean Willaim A. Schoenfeld of Oregon State college. Carrying a message from the incapacitated state executive, confined to his bed at Salem with a serious throat infection, Schoenfeld declared the governor wished to warn people of this vicinity to “be alert” in combatting attempts of certain Pacific coast cities to force blanket rates for electric power produced by Bonneville dam and other federal projects in the west.

100 years ago – 1916

“Do your Christmas shipping early,” pleads Postmaster R. E. Williams. The local office has received a supply of placards which urge the public to mail parcels early, wrap them securely and address them plainly. The placards remind the public that parcels may be endorsed, “Not to be Opened Until Christmas,” or with similar notations. Postmaster Williams hopes to prevent the usual Christmas “swamp” at the office. Owing to the fact that Christmas day falls on Monday, the local office will be open all day Christmas, and the rural and city carriers will make their usual deliveries.

Charles Darnielle, one of the proprietors of Hotel Albert and a candidate at the recent election for county sheriff, has a “crow to pick” with the person who stole the cushion from the Albert hotel auto Saturday night. The machine was parked in front of the hotel from 8 o’clock until 11, and the thief stole the front seat cushion during that time. “If the person will bring the cushion back again I’ll pay a reward for it. It was a good cushion and is worth something to me. I wont’ ask questions and I’ll pay a good reward to get it back again,” declared Mr. Darnielle today.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 4. – It will take $1,654,819,654.03 to run the government of the United States from June 30, 1917 to June 30, 1918. This is the estimate of the heads of the various branches of the government of the country submitted to congress today through Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo.



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