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Looking Back, from Dec. 25

Terray Harmon, Bill Dodson, Mike Kilkeney and Gary Conley contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery, above, is an aerial survey photograph taken prior to building of The Dalles Dam. It was scanned from a print provided by Terray Harmon.
The view is from the Oregon side of the river, facing north. Seufert’s Cannery is visible near the outlet of Fifteenmile Creek, near the center left of the photograph. The Dalles/Celilo Canal and the Big Eddy can be seen to the upper right. 
Bill Dodson noted that the foreground ranch was the Beyers Ranch along Fifteenmile, and cherry trees, as well as an apricot orchard, are visible.
Terray Harmon noted that the dam was basically built on the dry land seen in the upper right corner of the photograh.
The photograph was likely taken in the late 1940s.

Terray Harmon, Bill Dodson, Mike Kilkeney and Gary Conley contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, is an aerial survey photograph taken prior to building of The Dalles Dam. It was scanned from a print provided by Terray Harmon. The view is from the Oregon side of the river, facing north. Seufert’s Cannery is visible near the outlet of Fifteenmile Creek, near the center left of the photograph. The Dalles/Celilo Canal and the Big Eddy can be seen to the upper right. Bill Dodson noted that the foreground ranch was the Beyers Ranch along Fifteenmile, and cherry trees, as well as an apricot orchard, are visible. Terray Harmon noted that the dam was basically built on the dry land seen in the upper right corner of the photograh. The photograph was likely taken in the late 1940s. The Dalles Chronicle

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Tamara Quinton, Alene Thille and Lucile Stephens contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4-inch by 5-inch black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/The Dalles Optimist. Information on the envelope reads, “Quality Shoe Store, Jim Themeles, Sept. 17, 1954.” Alene Thille wrote that in 1961, it was kown as the "Karl Shoe Store." It was on Second Street, across from Klindt's Booksellers. “I remember buying a pair of black patent leather shoes for $10 in about 1961,” Thille said. Tamara Quinton wrote that later, in the 1970’s and ‘80s, it became Sharold's shoe store, owned by Harold Hays. Lucile Stephens of Dufur wrote that she purchased her first saddle shoes at the store, when she was in high school, around 1949, 1950.

20 years ago – 1996

A snow slide just east of the Interstate 84 tunnel at Cascade Locks closed all eastbound traffic and all but one lane of westbound traffic on the freeway this morning. In addition, a mixture of snow, sleet and freezing rain made driving conditions treacherous throughout the Mid-Columbia. According to an employee at the Oregon Department of Transportation in Cascade Locks, crews were on the scene of the snow slide at press time and were working to reopen the freeway. The employee also noted that the entire freeway was covered with packed snow and freezing rain was falling at 9 a.m.

With the most difficult trail segment behind them, the Riverfront Trail committee is optimistic about the future. “It’s coming together, we’re really all very excited about what we’ve done so far and the prospects for the future,” said Dan Durow, director of community and economic development for the city of The Dalles.

40 years ago – 1976

Workers at Martin Marietta Aluminum and the plant have contributed $12,389.07 to the United Way Fund. Workers gave $6,189.07. Martin Marietta is matching that with $6,200 and that is 18 per cent more than the $10,368 the company and employes gave last year. Three shifts donated more than their goals. D-shift gave $660.65, 110 per cent of its $600 goal. C-shift gave $617.00, 103 per cent of its $600-goal.

60 years ago – 1956

Construction of Harvey Aluminum Co.’s huge aluminum reduction plant near the west edge of the city moved another step forward with announcement today of a contract award for the rectifier building. Hoffman Construction Co., Portland, has been awarded the general contract in an amount described as “in excess of $200,000.”

Plans for an early start on the structures that will house the potlines also were announced today. A Harvey spokesman, describing the rectifier building project, said the 43 by 482-foot structure will be built of reinforced concrete secretions pre-cast on the ground and then raised to position by crane.

At least two persons have been killed on Washington State highways during the holiday season.

Lt. C. D. Daniels of the Salvation Army reported that Christmas dinner baskets weighing about 30 pounds each are being distributed today with deliveries made by the Model Laundry Co., Daniels and George Bailey. Daniels said 36 baskets, containing chicken or ham and all the trimmings, are being delivered today plus 12 grocery store food orders for families whose names were turned in too late to receive a basket.

80 years ago – 1936

The Dalles today prepared to celebrate an “Australian” Christmas, lacking completely the snow, sleigh bells, crackling fires to keep winter’s supposed chill away from the hearthside and all the other boreal attributes of the holiday season.

With the air left warm by recent rains and the sun shining brightly from a clear sky, it was certain that Santa would be forced to cover this territory in some conveyance other than a sled. Showers were the only weather even faintly characteristic of winter forecast for Christmas day.

Greater progress will be made during 1937 than in any year since the World war in the campaign to stamp out syphilis and reduce the widespread prevalence of gonorrhea in the United States, according to Dr. William F. Snow, general director of the American Social Hygiene association.

Important factors in the drive to eradicate these destructive social diseases, according to Dr. Snow, are funds available through the United States public health service and the children’s bureau, and the changed attitude of newspapers and popular magazines, making possible the education of the public through frank scientific discussion.

Dr. Snow estimates that there are about six million men, women and children in the United States now infected with syphilis, although “not one in ten is under treatment by a licensed physician.”

Price of eggs advanced one cent in all grades today, except standard mediums, which rose two cents. Butter prices were unchanged. Turkey prices were unchanged; chickens were said to be lower in spots.

100 years ago – 1916

A rumor to the effect that some taxpayers of The Dalles would attempt to abolish the office of the county agriculturist, on the grounds of economy, caused a large delegation of farmers to attend the taxpayers’ meeting at the court house today, when the 1917 budget was considered by the county court.

As a result of the talks on the part of the farmers, A. R. Chase, the county agriculturist, will be retained next year and his salary would probably have been raised from $1600 to $1800 had it not been made by Mr. Chase, himself, and others, who are in favor of his work, who advised against such action, believing $1600 sufficient.

Congressman N. J. Sinnott has received notice from the department of agriculture that he has been allowed a limited number of packages of alfalfa, field pea, millet, Sudan grass and clover seed.

Because of the very limited supply on hand this year the rule has been made that only one package of seeds can be sent to a person. Those wishing a package of the seeds should write to Congressman Sinnott for the same at once, before the supply is exhausted.

American border patrols have been warned by military authorities to be on the alert today. From several sources reports have been received that armed bands have been seen across the Rio Grande where there are no Carranzista garrisons.

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