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Looking Back on Jan. 3

Cary Lowe, Terray Harmon, Robbie Anderson, Russ Brown, Dale Roberts and Gary Conley contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery photograph, above, was scanned from a 5 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the negative’s envelop reads, “Tygh Valley Lumber Co. (Henry Pein) Log Pond, 18 acres. August 16, 1954.”
Cary Lowe noted you can see some buildings at Wasco County fairgrounds in the background, and the west end of Tygh Ridge and where Shadybrook Road turns toward the White River Game Management Area.
Russ Brown said it looks like the photo was taken not long before they filled the log pond, after the Mountain Fir Lumber company closed the pond. Irene Sullenger said it was the old Cody Mill pond.
Terray Harmon said green logs were stored in the pond to keep them from drying out, and the logs to one side were “sinkers,” logs that sank in the pond and were pulled out.

The Dalles Chronicle
Cary Lowe, Terray Harmon, Robbie Anderson, Russ Brown, Dale Roberts and Gary Conley contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery photograph, above, was scanned from a 5 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the negative’s envelop reads, “Tygh Valley Lumber Co. (Henry Pein) Log Pond, 18 acres. August 16, 1954.” Cary Lowe noted you can see some buildings at Wasco County fairgrounds in the background, and the west end of Tygh Ridge and where Shadybrook Road turns toward the White River Game Management Area. Russ Brown said it looks like the photo was taken not long before they filled the log pond, after the Mountain Fir Lumber company closed the pond. Irene Sullenger said it was the old Cody Mill pond. Terray Harmon said green logs were stored in the pond to keep them from drying out, and the logs to one side were “sinkers,” logs that sank in the pond and were pulled out.



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Cary Lowe, Carolyn Homer, Lee Langston, Lucile and Harold Stephens all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The negative was labeled “Dam, The Dalles, last concrete pour. April 4, 1958. The view appears to be looking downstream, with Highway 30 and the railroad bridge over 15-mile Creek visible in the background, and can still be seen from the Dalles Dam Visitor Center on Bret Clodfelter Way in The Dalles. Cary Lowe said the location appeared to be the powerhouse/icetrash sluiceway, with the switching structure at the right part of the main unit 1 and 2; a 115 kilovolt feed that used to feed the aluminum plant but now ends up just below Dry Hollow School. Lowe added that the large bucket was a Whirley Crane that was “swinging the mud,” and appears to be at EW-1. “I keep looking at the glare back from the window on the Whirley Crane and using my magnifying glass I swear that is Ernie Dollarhide in the drive seat,” he wrote. Carolyn Homer recognized the dam, and said her folks had a store across from Dallesport on the Goldendale Highway at the time. “We had cabins, as well as a grocery store, and a lot of the guys stayed there during the construction of the dam. They bought a lot of gas, and groceries, and we did a terrific business.”

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Dale Roberts of Maupin, Terray Harmon and Gary Conley all contributed to this report. The image above was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. Casey Roberts worked at the plant as a teenager, and wrote: “The area in the photograph for the History Mystery looks very much like the dock at the west end of what was then the Stadelman Fruit Company packing house. “Today the packing house is at West First Street and Bargeway Road and is owned by The Dalles Cherry Growers. “The dock area was used for storing and repairing the used whiskey barrels that Stadelman Fruit Company purchased for use in making Maraschino cherries. I worked in that area for a couple of summers during high school in the mid 1950s. Mostly, I tightened up the hoops using cooperage tools so that the barrel staves were tight enough together to prevent, or at least minimize, leakage. “Once the bottom head was secured in the barrel and the hoops driven toward the center of the barrel to tighten the barrel for use, each barrel was filled with cherries and a dilute solution of sulfur dioxide in water which served to preserve and bleach the cherries. The barrel was then sealed as the top head was put in place and secured with a top hoop. “Later, the cherries would be immersed in the coloring and syrup which turned them into Maraschino cherries. “During the mid 1950s, George Stadelman, Jr., was, I believe, a student at the University of Oregon at the time and during the summers worked in the packing house run by his father. I worked under a man named Jim Goff. “I don't recall the east side of the roof being open, so I assume that either part of the roof was blown off or, less likely, this was when the roof was being installed. “Inside the packing house were several conveyors loaded with fresh fruit (cherries for most of the year), alongside of which women (I don't recall any men) would pick individual cherries and hand pack them into boxes for shipping.” Gary Conley added it must have been “One heck of a windstorm, one that ripped the roof off and made a real mess.”

January 3

20 Years Ago-1996

Civic Auditorium supporters are finishing the latest part of their renovation project this week and looking ahead to the next part. Youth workers are adding coats of paint to the recently constructed ballroom stairway. The stairway, which was funded with a grant from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), provided a second emergency exit from the ballroom, according to John Will, treasurer of the Civic Auditorium Historic Preservation Committee.

The Northern Wasco County Park & Recreation District believes that “children’s play is essential to the human development process.” With that thought in mind the District’s new “Wonder Gym” is now in session. The new one-day-per-week program will address many of the fitness needs of a youngster. Activities will center on the ABC’s of fitness including, motor skill development, hand-eye coordination, social development and “plain old fashioned fun,” according to a press release from the district.

40 Years Ago-1976

Gathering public opinions on ideas for improving the community this week drew indications that people feel The Dalles is a good place to live. Some people said they felt they could gripe about many things, but on assessing the whole spectrum, they felt they had an extremely good community.

A proposed policy on improving narrow streets and for handling traffic on them in The Dalles is coming up for a public hearing Jan. 19. The plan cites 20 streets which are considered “substandard” under present street width standards. It also summarizes some present priorities on improving them, some social and economic considerations involved.

60 Years Ago-1956

Major business to come before Dalles City council tonight, according to City Manager Gifford Miller, is naming of 15 city streets, as approved for public hearing by the city council during its Dec. 19 meeting. The council also will consider extension of nine fire protection contracts with firms outside the city limits, all except two outside the western boundary.

A group of Dalles uranium prospectors has hit “pay dirt” near Grants, N.M., and is making preparations for mining. Headed by Pace Foster, the group is drawing up papers of incorporation for $300,000 and is negotiating with the Atomic Energy Commission for a loan to help in mining the ore. AEC has notified the group that the ore has assayed at 1.11 and 1.90 per cent. Any ore measuring up to .10 is considered worthy of mining. The ore is presently worth about $300 per ton.

80 Years Ago-1936

As a result of the exceptionally low level of the Columbia River during the last month, C. A. Klindt of The Dalles is the proud possessor of an interesting collection of stone relics, which probably date back to an age preceding the Christian era in this part of the country. The relics, which number more than 100, include many specimens of the old Indian mixing bowls used for the grinding of wheat and corn, as well as a number of perfectly formed Indian hammers and pestles.

Selection of 200 Wasco County persons for possible jury service during 1936 was made by the county court yesterday. Panels for service during circuit court terms will be drawn from the list prior to the beginning of each term, and the individual jurors summoned.

100 Years Ago-1916

That Luther B. Fox is as efficient as they make ‘em when it comes to county-clerking, is evidenced by the fact that he finished compiling a complete statistical report for the county clerk’s office of Wasco County at 5:15 o’clock Friday afternoon, just 15 minutes after his office was closed for the year 1915. The last official act in the office of the county clerk during the year was the issuance of a marriage license, just as the clock was striking 5.

The football aggregation of high school players and alumni which was gathered by Bob Murray beat the East Side Athletic club of Portland on snow-covered Amotan field Saturday afternoon, 20 to 0. Only nine men came from Portland and it was necessary for Manager Klein to pick up two gridiron men here. Being a Columbia University student, Mr. Klein induced Alfred Bennett of this city, who is a Columbia student and football player, to join his team for the afternoon, and also secured the services of “Bud” Leipold, who proved during the contest that he knows something about football as well as basketball.

FROM JAN 3

In reference to a previous History Mystery photo, which shows wind damage at the Stadelman Fruit Company, above, Lucile Stephens said she worked fresh cherries for a season at the Stadelman Fruit Company, above. “We stood on boards laid out on the ground,” she said. “I bought one of the barrels for $2.50, and made a toy [container] out of it. Now it’s being used as a firewood carrier at our house.”



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