0

Looking back on January 31

Mike Keith, Terray Harmon, LaVerna Harmier, Laurel Slatt and Casey Roberts contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Stadelmann-Bonn Hardware Company, toy section, Dec. 1, 1954.
Several of those responding gave the location as being in the building now occupied by Hamptons Furniture, downtown The Dalles. LaVerna Harmier and Laurel Slatt said Williams ID was also formerly at that location.
Although it was a called a hardware store, Terray Harmon said it was really a mercantile. “They had everything in there, toys clothes, everything.”

Mike Keith, Terray Harmon, LaVerna Harmier, Laurel Slatt and Casey Roberts contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Stadelmann-Bonn Hardware Company, toy section, Dec. 1, 1954. Several of those responding gave the location as being in the building now occupied by Hamptons Furniture, downtown The Dalles. LaVerna Harmier and Laurel Slatt said Williams ID was also formerly at that location. Although it was a called a hardware store, Terray Harmon said it was really a mercantile. “They had everything in there, toys clothes, everything.”

photo

UPDATE Regarding a previous History Mystery photograph of the Western Aluminum Producers (M.M. Al) Plant, Casey Roberts wrote: The metal framework that was in the foreground, and which has been identified as being in the local aluminum plant, is most likely an anode electrode used in melting the bauxite aluminum ore. If I remember correctly, there were at least a couple of lines of "pots" or electrolysis cells in the main building and each one would have had one of these anodes. The anodes consisted of the steel framework seen in the picture which was filled with a mixture of carbon and coal-tar pitch, which was the actual anode. The "floor" of the inside of the steel frame appears to be the top of the pitch layer that would be several inches thick and in contact with the bauxite underneath it during the smelting process. The anode would have been hoisted up from the pictured location and moved to the pot lines to cover the pots after the cells were filled with bauxite. The smelting of aluminum requires large amounts of current being passed through the bauxite in the electrolytic cell, which is the reason the plant was located here, near The Dalles Dam. During a summer when I was in college, I worked as a lab technician at what was then the Harvey Aluminum plant and sampling the carbon/pitch mixture was something I did on occasion. I learned the hard way that the pitch is a "photo-sensitizing agent" when I got a severe sunburn after a short exposure to the sun. Terray Harmon contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery photo, above, was scanned from a 2 1/4 by 2 1/4-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelop reads, “Western Alum. Producers (M.M. Al) Plant and staff pictures. March 15, 1979.” Harmon noted the photo must have been taken in the foundry portion of the plant, where they manufactured “ingots, pigs and logs.”

January 31

20 Years Ago-1996

Instead of making arrests and handing out tickets, some local law enforcement officers are now spending time at D-12 schools talking to students and answering any questions they may have. Officers Bryan Drake, Steve Taylor and Jeff Kienlen of The Dalles City Police, and Dept. Mark Putty of the Wasco County Sheriff’s office are the officers that have been assigned the school detail.

About five years ago, the Dalles School District bought kits for teaching art in grade school. They have yet to be used to the extent intended, however, and officials want to change that. The Dalles school board Thursday head a review of the district’s art, music and foreign language curricular, and the ways administrators want to modify them. A first step in the lower grades, said High School Principal Dave Beasley, would be to use the kits more and provide training for the staff on integrating them into the curriculum.

40 Years Ago-1976

Leslie Bradbury, superintendent of the Dufur Schools, was elected vice president of the Oregon Association of Secondary School Administrators at that group’s mid-winter conference held in Portland this week. Bradbury will serve in that post for the 1976-77 school year and is also president elect of the association for the following year. At age 36, he is one of the youngest men to hold that office in the association’s history.

R.J. Houska, administrator of The Dalles General Hospital, died unexpectedly last night after suffering an apparent heart attack. He was 50. Houska was stricken while at the Elks Club and was dead on arrival at the hospital where he was taken by ambulance, Hospital Board Chairman Farwell Booth said. Brent Boothe, anesthetist at the hospital, will serve temporarily as administrator.

60 Years Ago-1956

A total of 6.3 inches of snow has been dumped on The Dalles the past few days with a half inch of moisture, and the weatherman predicted snow flurries later this afternoon. The rest of the state also is experiencing heavy snows and cold weather, while a fast-moving snow storm swept out of the Midwest into the Ohio Valley this morning, dumping sleet, freezing rain and nearly a foot of snow.

The Rowena elementary school is to receive $2,516 in federal aid to connection with education of children from Dalles dam workers’ families, according to Oregon Sen. Richard L. Neuberger. The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare notified Neuberger that an initial check for $1,635 has been sent to Wasco County School District 86.

80 Years Ago-1936

Fewer voters of The Dalles and Wasco County will go to the polls tomorrow to cast ballots in the special state election than in any other election of recent years, public officials and others who attempt to keep in close touch with public sentiment on political matters were forecasting today. Lack of interest among voters in the four measurers on the ballot and the strong possibility that cold weather will keep most individuals in their homes or offices were held out as reasons for the forecast.

City recorder J. H. Steers has little hope that Utopia ever will be reached in the matter of traffic law observance. He reached that state of mind this morning after reading a letter from a Portland man who left his automobile parked on Second Street longer than the 60 minutes allowed, while stopping in The Dalles last Friday. Steers said that the man, of all automobile drivers in the state should set an example to others in observing motor traffic regulations to the letter. The letter was signed by Ray Conway, general manager of the Oregon State Motor association.

100 Years Ago-1916

Eighteen owners of the largest cherry orchards in this section gathered at the Business Men’s association building last evening to consider the proposition of pollination of the orchards. This meeting was called to hear the report of G. E. Sanders, who was sent to the Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis by the business men to gather data as to the best method to use in properly fertilizing the cherry trees.

Despite the inclement weather and bad roads, many farmers and their wives came to The Dalles to take advantage of the lectures and demonstrations of the Oregon Agricultural college “movable school,” which was opened at the high school yesterday morning. Between 60 and 70 farmers attended the illustrated lecture on hog management and types and breeds of dairy cattle last night, and went away better equipped to conduct their business. The women who enjoyed the instruction along the lines of home economics yesterday included 35 from the rural districts.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from the Chronicle and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)