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Looking Back, June 12

Larry Thomas, Terray Harmon, Barbara Haskins, Diana Ezelle, Lucile Stephens and Dale Roberts all contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned form a 35 mm black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle.
The information on the envelope reads, “Recreation Sites, The Dalles Dam, Aug. 3, 1957, 35 mm film.”
This is one of the earliest films in this format found in the archive, and it eventually replaced the 2 1/4-inch square and 4- by 5-inch film formats used through the 1950s and early 1960s. 
The images are from a tour of recreational sites at the dam. Diana Ezelle noted that “opening day” at the dam was March 10, 1957, just a few months prior.
The view is looking to the south, taken in the vicinity of the north side fish ladder, said Larry Thomas. 
Barbara Haskins recognize many in the group, including her Uncle Bud and Aunt Bonnie. She said it appeared to be an official tour, as they were all dressed in their best. 
Lucille Stephens also noted, in regards to the previous History Mystery photo of Tygh Valley Elementary School, above, that the new school in the photo was built to serve families working at the lumber mill in Tygh Valley.

The Dalles Chronicle
Larry Thomas, Terray Harmon, Barbara Haskins, Diana Ezelle, Lucile Stephens and Dale Roberts all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned form a 35 mm black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Recreation Sites, The Dalles Dam, Aug. 3, 1957, 35 mm film.” This is one of the earliest films in this format found in the archive, and it eventually replaced the 2 1/4-inch square and 4- by 5-inch film formats used through the 1950s and early 1960s. The images are from a tour of recreational sites at the dam. Diana Ezelle noted that “opening day” at the dam was March 10, 1957, just a few months prior. The view is looking to the south, taken in the vicinity of the north side fish ladder, said Larry Thomas. Barbara Haskins recognize many in the group, including her Uncle Bud and Aunt Bonnie. She said it appeared to be an official tour, as they were all dressed in their best. Lucille Stephens also noted, in regards to the previous History Mystery photo of Tygh Valley Elementary School, above, that the new school in the photo was built to serve families working at the lumber mill in Tygh Valley.



photo

Terray Harmon, Dale Roberts, Agnes Brown, Gary Conley and Daniel contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery photograph, above, was scanned from a 2 1/4- by 2 1/4 -inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The information on the envelope reads, “Tygh Valley School, Jan. 2, 1956.” Agnes Brown, who lives in Tygh Valley, said that the school pictured was built after the old school burned down in the 1950s. The school is now used as a community center. Terray Harmon said that the History Mystery picture above shows the Burlington Northern track in the Moody Bridge area of the Deschutes River, and the barges in the background are on Miller Island.

Looking Back, June 12

20 Years Ago – 1996

HOOD RIVER – A multi-year study of environmental threats to the Columbia River falls short when it comes to recommending corrective action, a local conservation group claims. “The Health of the River, 1890-96,” issued last month, is the end product of the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program, an exhaustive, six-year effort designed to determine the health of the river downstream from Bonneville Dam. The study identified several problem areas in the river, including high levels of toxic pollutants such as dioxins and DDT, loss of wetlands, bacteria outbreaks and declining salmon runs. The conservation group has issued its own response to the study, “The Columbia – River in Crisis.”

It’s a perfect match: the Dry Hollow Elementary students enjoyed reading books aloud, and Martha Carlson is an avid reader who needed to feel useful. Carlson, who lives at Flagstone Retirement and Assisted Living, two weeks ago became the latest volunteer to help out at Dry Hollow Elementary. “The kids loved it this morning,” second grade teacher Nonie Cornell said Monday. “It was great.” Carlson came to the school the last two Mondays, spending just over an hour listening to students read to her. For some students, reading aloud helps them comprehend the material better, Cornell said. Though school ends this week, Carlson is thinking about helping out with the summer reading program the school district is developing.

40 Years Ago – 1976

Fireplugs in one neighborhood of The Dalles are taking on a new look because of the efforts of a Portland commercial artist who is visiting her parents in The Dalles. Kathleen Zucati, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Krass, 400 E. Eighth Street, has been busy painting fireplugs in that neighborhood. So far she has painted a Chinese tourist with a camera on the corner of East Eighth and Federal, a back packer with blue jeans and an orange backpack on the corner of East Ninth and Federal, and an American Astronaut on East Eighth a block from Federal. Her latest was being created at East Eigth and Laughlin on Friday and is supposed to be “a black Uncle Sam” but “some people that see it will see it as what they want it to be.”

More than 1,000 delegates for the 103rd annual Oregon Grange Convention will begin meetings Sunday in The Dalles Junior High School. Certain to be of interest is the Grange sponsored proposal to ban certain corporate ownership for farms in an effort to preserve the family-operated farm. Portions of the convention are open to the public.

A picnic, dance program, and cake auction are scheduled in Sorosis Park Sunday to raise money to buy a new water pump for Vogt Fountain. The picnic is at 2 p.m. with the Eleanor Borg School of Dance “Those Were The Days” historical program at 2:30. Cake auctions begin at 3:15. Cakes for the auction are needed, Alf Wernmark, head of the park association reports.

60 Years Ago – 1956

The Wasco County grand jury yesterday returned indictments against two men arrested earlier in connection with the theft of 800 pounds of copper wire and the grand jury officially noted “uncleanliness in the city jail.” Jay V. Irwin, 33, and Carl John Ewald, 27, both of Portland, were indicted on charges of grand larceny in connection with a May 1 theft of 800 pounds of copper wire from Union Pacific railroad. Following the return of the true bill by the grand jury, the two men were arraigned before Circuit Judge Malcolm Wilkinson with Sam Van Vactor as their court-appointed attorney. The men are scheduled to enter their pleas at 10 a.m. tomorrow in Wilkinson’s court.

A special Corps of Engineers color film depicting construction of The Dalles dam will be shown tonight to employees of the Relocation Division of the Army Engineers here and their families. The film will be projected by Corps of Engineers photographer Wayne Buchanan of Portland. The showing will be held in the Community Room of the Civic Auditorium starting at 7:30 p.m.

80 Years Ago – 1936

Advertisement: TRADE IN your old phonograph, piano, or furniture on electric refrigerator. Forsberg Appliance Co., 217 East Third St.

The Dalles Cooperative Growers Plant broke all previous records for a single day’s run when 145 tons of local cherries were received at the plant and barreled yesterday, H. G. Miller, manager, reported. The cherries filled a total of 1,811 barrels, and it took four coopers 10 hours to complete their day’s work, Miller said. Miller said it was possible an even greater amount would be barreled today.

The rain Saturday afternoon nearly reached cloudburst proportions on Mt. Hood flat, with small streams running in the roads in places. It also washed the Obrist grade quite badly.

100 Years Ago - 1916

The joke is on Charles Darnielle and Levi Chrisman, rival candidates for the office of sheriff of Wasco County. Edward C. Pease and Judd S. Fish are the perpetrators. Mr. Chrisman and Mr. Darnielle were much in evidence at the Farmers’ Union picnic at Friend Saturday. Taking advantage of the balmy day and the good nature of the picnickers, the two talked politics to everyone they met. Casually, they mentioned the fact that they are candidates for office and suggested the promise of a vote might be acceptable. Seeking to enjoy good smokes without wasting personal funds for this pleasure, Mr. Pease and Mr. Fish interrupted a political colloquy and invited those in the group to enjoy a smoke at the expense of Messrs. Darnielle and Chrisman. Mr. Fish begged the women and children to eat ice cream and candy at the expense of the candidates and the offer was eagerly accepted. The joke cost the victims $10.70, which they paid, smilingly.

Flag Day will be observed by the local lodge of Elks on the lawn east of their club Wednesday evening at 8:30 o’clock. Walter H. Evans, district attorney of Multnomah county, will be the principal speaker. Refreshments will be served in the club by a group of young women, following the out-of-door programme. Dancing will be enjoyed in the ball room. Miss Wilma Donnell will recite the history of the flag from the Elks’ ritual and Miss Erma Bennett will recite the Elks’ tribute to the flag. Everyone in the city is invited to attend these ceremonies.



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