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Looking Back on June 26

Dan Kincheloe, Donna Robertson, Diane Ezelle, Lucille A. Stephens and Pam Clausen contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery, at right, was scanned from a 2 1/4- by 2 1/4-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The envelope simply reads, “Vogt Fountain, Aug. 33, 1966.”
The photograph seems to be from the restoration of the fountain and/or the dedication of the Memorial Rose garden at Sorosis Park.
Dan Kincheloe wrote that the woman pictured is Mrs. Frances Kincheloe, who was very involved in the garden club. Cheryl Broer Grant identified the man on the right as Walt Long.
Pam Clausen said that her aunt, Dorothy Cooper Kincheloe, in her 90s, remembers when she was a little girl the fountain sat by the US Bank on the corner of Third and Washington and was used by the teamsters to water their teams. Later it was dismantled and the pieces dumped at the park. 
Diana Ezelle wrote that a “lighting up” ceremony was held for the freshly restored fountain in 1966. The fountain was a gift to the city of The Dalles from Maximillion Vogt, who left it to the city in his will.

The Dalles Chronicle
Dan Kincheloe, Donna Robertson, Diane Ezelle, Lucille A. Stephens and Pam Clausen contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, at right, was scanned from a 2 1/4- by 2 1/4-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The envelope simply reads, “Vogt Fountain, Aug. 33, 1966.” The photograph seems to be from the restoration of the fountain and/or the dedication of the Memorial Rose garden at Sorosis Park. Dan Kincheloe wrote that the woman pictured is Mrs. Frances Kincheloe, who was very involved in the garden club. Cheryl Broer Grant identified the man on the right as Walt Long. Pam Clausen said that her aunt, Dorothy Cooper Kincheloe, in her 90s, remembers when she was a little girl the fountain sat by the US Bank on the corner of Third and Washington and was used by the teamsters to water their teams. Later it was dismantled and the pieces dumped at the park. Diana Ezelle wrote that a “lighting up” ceremony was held for the freshly restored fountain in 1966. The fountain was a gift to the city of The Dalles from Maximillion Vogt, who left it to the city in his will.



photo

John Wood, Diana Ezel, Bill Johnson and Leslie Aasmer contributed to this report. Last Week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/Optimist. The information on the envelope reads, “Scenic Drive and south extension of Jefferson Street, looking east with Robert Fulton house in the background. Miss Jane Richardson in pictures.” The envelope was undated. Bill Johnson said it appears to have been taken in the late 1940s, as both of the vehicles in the photograph are 1947 models. John Wood said the pole on the left with five crossarms was the Bend telephone service line. “I worked on that line a number of times,” he said. Diana Ezele recognized the location, and said that it must have been taken when they were first paving the streets. Leslie Aasmer pointed out that Jefferson Street was behind the woman pictured, and the vehicles are parked on Scenic Drive.

Looking Back on June 26

20 years ago – 1996

Ham radio operators from throughout the Mid-Columbia gathered to put on a 25-hour “field day” this weekend broadcasting from the lock area at The Dalles Dam. “We’re trying to make as many contacts as we can,” said Jim Nadeau, field day chairman. The Mid-Columbia Amateur Radio Club had three high-frequency radio stations operating between 3.5 and 30 megahertz on five bands around the clock. Their antennas were strung from a boom crane near the locks, as well as from various light poles around the area. Despite their close proximity to the dam, the group supplied its own electricity using a gas generator. The field day is intended as a drill for emergency conditions. “We’re supposed to be roughing it without connecting to the mains,” said Nadeau. The radio operators were participating in a world-wide event, making contacts with other hams throughout the world. In the U.S. alone, some 35,000 hams participate.

GOLDENDALE, Wash. – Maryhill Museum of Art will hold a special exhibit of recent icons by Russian artist Pavel Tikhmirov. The exhibit will continue through September 13. Tikhmirov was born in the city of Kineshman, Russia. As a youth he moved to Kholui to study traditional icon painting techniques from masters of iconography, then for many years, he worked restoring old masterpieces in major cathedrals throughout Russia. As a mature artist he has received numerous commissions from the Russian government to paint icons as gifts for visiting heads of state, including a lacquered box depicting the Yelets Ascension Cathedral for President Ronald Reagan. His paintings have been given the designation of “National treasure of Russia” by the government of that country.

40 years ago – 1976

LOS ANGELES (UPI) —The United States secretly used cloud seeding to dry up the Cuban sugar crop in 1969 and 1970, Lowell Ponte, a former Pentagon think tank researcher, said Saturday. “Between 1966 and 1972 the CIA and later the Pentagon were using cloud-seeding to make enemy trails muddy in Southeast Asia,” Ponte said in an interview for National Public Radio. “But the seeding near Cuba was to cause less rain, not more. It was supposed to squeeze rain out of clouds before they reached the island. You might say we tried to embargo rainclouds.” The experimental seeding was stepped up in 1970, Ponte said, because Cuban Premier Fidel Castro staked the honor of his Communist government on the success of that year’s sugar crop.

Approved fireworks are being sold by The Dalles Area Jaycees at three locations. Jaycee Mark Bartell was operating the booth at the Coast to Coast parking lot this morning. Other booths are at Easthill Sentry Market and on the north side of West Sixth Street at Cascade Shopping Center. Jaycees will present giant fireworks show in the new rodeo arena July 4 as soon as darkness falls.

Fourteen units have filed to participate in the Bicentennial parade here July 3. The entry deadline is June 30. Openings for floats, cars, marching, and mounted units are available. American Legion Post 19 will furnish the color guard and lead the parade.

60 years ago – 1956

Dog poisoning continued in Chenowith as Mrs. L. D. Henderson found their family pet dead in the driveway of their home yesterday morning. Deputy Sheriff Del Goss said he estimated the number of poisonings to be about 24 in the past few weeks. The sheriff’s department is continuing to work on a solution to the problem.

TOKYO (UP) – The United States exploded another hydrogen bomb today, Japanese scientists reported. They called it part of a series of rival tests being carried out simultaneously with the Soviet Union. The U.S. explosion was detected by the Central Meteorological Observatory here which recorded “unusual atmospheric shocks.” It said the hydrogen bomb probably was exploded in the Bikini area, scene of other H-bomb tests. The Russian hydrogen bomb blast was reported to have occurred June 19 or 20. Dr. Hironobu Watanabe of Niigata University said he detected the explosion through radioactivity tests made on “hot” rain which fell in Niigata. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in Washington refused to comment on the reports but a spokesman pointed out that the AEC announced in April there would be at least ten shots in the current series of tests. “We are not commenting on specific reports of the progress of the series of tests out there,” the AEC spokesman said.

One of the most modern aggregate plants in the Pacific Northwest is being dismantled at The Dalles dam by Atkinson-Ostrander Co. The plant was used to make aggregate for the concrete batch plant that also will be taken down in a couple of weeks. The aggregate plant was installed at the dam in 1953 and has been used on the firm’s contracts on the navigation locks, parts of the powerhouse, and spillway. The firm has poured more than a million yard of concrete into the project.

80 years ago – 1936

Democrats of the county are expected to converge on The Dalles tomorrow evening, when an open air rally to hear the broadcast of President Roosevelt’s speech accepting his renomination by the democratic national convention now being held in Philadelphia has been scheduled. Judge George C. Blakeley, chairman of the Wasco county democratic central committee, announced that all persons regardless of age or party affiliation were welcome to attend the Roosevelt day rally, and that no admission is being charged. The local event is part of a nation-wide political rally, Blakeley explained. Similar rallies are being held in all other Oregon counties under sponsorship of the various county central committees, and in other states throughout the nation.

PORTLAND, June 26. (IP) – Cash wheat: Big Bend bluestem, hard white 13 per cent $1.15; dark hard winter 12 percent 99c; soft white 82c; western white 82c; northern spring 80½ c; western red 80½ c.

The current series of migratory bird hunting stamps will have their last day of sale on June 30, and the new 1936-37 series will be available at all postoffices beginning July 1.

100 years ago – 1916

EAGLE PASS, Tex., June 26. (UPI) — Destruction of the American consulate in Torreon on June 18 by Carranzista soldiers and civilians of Torreon, lead by the mayor, was described today by American refugees arriving here. Members of the party say they saw the mayor of Torreon, with troops and a military band, followed by 3000 citizens, march to the consulate, shouting “Death to the gringoes.” They tore the American shield from the front of the building, then demolished the structure and its contents. A mass meeting was held in the plaza later. The mayor and other Mexican officials counselled the mob to violence against all Americans. The refugees, numbering 10, were aided in their escape by the British consul. They were furnished a special train by the Carranza military authorities and were unmolested en route.

FOR SALE – Two choice improved farms of 160 acres each, 12 miles southwest of the Dalles, Ore., on Pleasant Ridge, RFD and telephone line, near country store. Will sell one or both for $30 per acre. Part cash. Come to place or write J. H. Howell, Boyd, Ore.

THE DALLES FLORAL CO. – We fill orders for carnations and all hot house flowers. Telephone main 421.

To See Naval Service. – Lewis Gunning, Frank Tyler and Alfred Bayley, three boys who were graduated from The Dalles high school this year, passed examinations in Portland yesterday which admitted them to the United States naval service. Gunning has been sent to the Bremerton naval yard near Seattle where he will become a second-class mechanic at a salary of $45 per month. He has gone into the engineering department. Tyler and Bayley will be sent to Mare Island, near San Francisco, where they will enter the medical corps of the United States navy, entering the yeomanly service.



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