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Looking Back on March 20

To guess this week’s photo, above, call Mark Gibson at (541) 506-4622 and leave your name and telephone number; be sure to spell your name. If the message box is full, press “0” and leave a message for the receptionist. You may fax responses to (541) 298-1365. or send an e-mail to MGibson @thedalleschronicle .com.


To guess this week’s photo, above, call Mark Gibson at (541) 506-4622 and leave your name and telephone number; be sure to spell your name. If the message box is full, press “0” and leave a message for the receptionist. You may fax responses to (541) 298-1365. or send an e-mail to MGibson @thedalleschronicle .com.



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To guess this week’s photo, above, call Mark Gibson at (541) 506-4622 and leave your name and telephone number; be sure to spell your name. If the message box is full, press “0” and leave a message for the receptionist. You may fax responses to (541) 298-1365. or send an e-mail to MGibson @thedalleschronicle .com.

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Kathy Vawter, Cary Lowe, Jake Grossmiller, Barb Mock, Janet Tschanz and Russ Brown all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery photograph, above, was scanned from a 4 by 5-inch negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/The Optimist. The information on the envelope reads, “Herman’s Men’s Store, Opening Pix, June 2, 1952.” The building is at 401 E. Second St., downtown The Dalles at the corner of Second and Federal Streets and last housed Tony’s Town and Country clothing store, owned by Jim Day until his retirement. Prior to Day, the business was owned by Tony Foote, according to Cary Lowe. On the left side of the photograph, the Oregon State Employment Service office can be seen, and The Optimist, whose sign reads “The Optimist ...A progressive Newspaper” and “Commercial Printing.” The photograph was most likely taken for the Optimist. <p>Jake Grossmiller wrote that “My folks rented a warehouse across the alley from these buildings for a beer distributing business, and I had a rental parking lot around that building and rented spaces for $5 a month so workers would not have to pay the parking meters.” <p>Russ Brown said that Herman’s was “a good outfit to deal with,” and added that the Fort Dalles Trading Post, visible at the far left of the photograph, was run by a man named Smith and carried a lot of Indian artifacts. The high sign only partially visible reads, “Indian beadwork.” Archive extra

March 20

20 Years Ago-1996

Regional jail backers have taken on assignments to work on designing, operating, and paying for a proposed six-county facility, to be located in The Dalles. The Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility (NORCOR) executive board met March 11 in Boardman and formed committees to pursue several areas needed to make the jail a reality. NORCOR received $3.3 million from the state in February under a statewide jail expansion program to handle less serious state prisoners, who will be remanded to counties starting in 1997.

A local obstetrician hopes to garner community support to present a teen sexuality program at The Dalles School District. Dr. David Mack spoke to the school board Thursday about a program he, the district attorney and a local psychiatrist have presented three other times in the last five years.

40 Years Ago-1976

A dozen open indictments against seven individuals were returned by a Wasco County Grand Jury on Thursday. In addition, the jurors returned four secret indictments.

Sgt. Darrell J. Hill of The Dalles Police Department was honored in graduation ceremonies Thursday at the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s training facilities at Quantico, VA. Hill was one of three Oregon police officers honored in the nearly 250 officers who received diplomas. They join 9, 662 officers who have completed the National Academy course.

60 Years Ago-1956

The St. Mary’s parents club collected $1,900 Saturday at their carnival held in the Civic Auditorium and the money will be used to furnish the new St. Mary’s Academy, reported Mrs. Frances Connolly, general chairman. A large crowd attended the affair, which featured dart games, a baseball pitch, a fish pond, a country store and a fortune telling booth.

An award of $5,000 was made by a federal court jury in Portland late yesterday to the owners of the Maryhill ferry landing on the Columbia River east of Biggs in connection with The Dalles Dam construction. Part of the area will be inundated by the reservoir behind the dam. The money is for 17 acres of river bank gravel land which includes the landing. C. T. Smith, owner of the 17 acres, and George P. Bacon, operator of the ferry, will receive the award. The government had offered $375 Bacon and Smith had countered that the land was worth $30,000.

80 Years Ago-1936

The Mid-Columbia Garage Company has taken a 5-year lease on the Vogt property at Third and Federal streets, and will develop the corner immediately, it was announced today by A. B. Shelley. The property, which measures 100 by 200 feet, was formerly occupied by a large brick garage building, ruined by fire nearly a year ago. The shop building, not completely destroyed, will be remodeled into modern display rooms and offices, and a super-service unit of the latest type will be erected on the front corner of the lot.

Police Commissioner Carl Unger, who assumed the city office Monday, has banned all money punchboards and counter dice game machines which have been operating openly at a number of beer parlors, pool halls and eating establishments in the city, he disclosed today. Unger spent his first two days in office making a thorough check of establishments in the city where various types of semi-gambling had been in progress and ordered out all forms definitely illegal.

100 Years Ago-1916

Constructed at a cost of $200,000, the new Oregon-Washington Railroad & Navigation Company terminals, in the eastern end of the city, have been completed, with the exception of the lower end of the yards and the coal dock. This is the last day of life for the old shops in the western part of the city. The work of mobbing the engines, machinery and materials from the old plant to the new will be commenced at 8 o’clock tomorrow morning.

“What’s the matter?” Cried and excited woman over the telephone to The Chronicle this morning. “The O.W.R. & N. Company is moving from the old shops to the new,” she was informed. “Oh,” was the reply, with a deep sigh of relief. “I thought something awful happen in Mexico and that everyone was being called out to fight.” That is what happened this morning when eight locomotives passed through town.



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