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Looking back on January 11, 2017

Lucile Stevens, Russ Brown, Laura Comini, Jack, Terray Harmon, Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart, Kathy Ursprung,  and Nan Wimmers all contributed to this week’s report.
Last week’s History Mystery, at right, was scanned from a black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/The Dalles Optimist. It is part of a collection taken for the Chamber of Commerce, and is dated 1949. Most of the collection bears the photographer’s stamp in red ink, one reading, “GEORGE LINDSAY, 312 Federal Street, THE DALLES, ORE,” and another “GEORGE LINDSAY, ‘Your Story in Pictures,’ 212 Federal ST., THE DALLES, OREGON.” The photograph was dated 1949, with no month or day. Other photographs in the collection were dated 1949, in the months of December and April.
The building was the U.S. National Bank building at the Northwest corner of East 3rd and Washington Streets.  The lower floor was the bank, the upper floors held professional offices, including doctors, dentists and lawyers.
Russ Brown said his mother owned the Vanity Beauty Shop on the third floor, just above the clock. “As a child I used to run the elevator up and down, the lady that ran the elevator let me run it.” The entrance for the upstairs was just to the right of the parked car. There was a dentist across the hall named Dr. Proctor, he added.
Laura Comini said the elevator operator was E. Rose. “It was a big building, it was too bad to see it go,” she said.
Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart wrote: “When I was a very young girl, I had to go through the BIG double doors, up the BIG elevator to see my dentist, who traveled up from Portland once a month.  He put braces on my teeth, which I hated. It was such a BIG building, you know how things are when you're little.”
Kathy Ursprung said the U.S. Bank Building in The Dalles was the first branch bank in the United States it opened in 1933. Before that, banks were stand-alone institutions. For many years after that, many states still did not allow branch banking.
“My mother, Josephine Brown, owned a beauty salon in that building known as the Vanity Beauty Shop not long before it was torn down. I remember visiting her there as a very young child,” Ursprung added.
Bill Dodson of Rufus said there was still a clock like the one pictured on the old building in Hood River. He said the building was torn down in the early 1960s. “I helped put the glass into the new building,” he said.
The Portland-based bank’s history is online at www.pdxhistory.com/html/portland_banks.html.
The building was torn down in the 1960s, according to one caller.

Lucile Stevens, Russ Brown, Laura Comini, Jack, Terray Harmon, Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart, Kathy Ursprung, and Nan Wimmers all contributed to this week’s report. Last week’s History Mystery, at right, was scanned from a black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/The Dalles Optimist. It is part of a collection taken for the Chamber of Commerce, and is dated 1949. Most of the collection bears the photographer’s stamp in red ink, one reading, “GEORGE LINDSAY, 312 Federal Street, THE DALLES, ORE,” and another “GEORGE LINDSAY, ‘Your Story in Pictures,’ 212 Federal ST., THE DALLES, OREGON.” The photograph was dated 1949, with no month or day. Other photographs in the collection were dated 1949, in the months of December and April. The building was the U.S. National Bank building at the Northwest corner of East 3rd and Washington Streets. The lower floor was the bank, the upper floors held professional offices, including doctors, dentists and lawyers. Russ Brown said his mother owned the Vanity Beauty Shop on the third floor, just above the clock. “As a child I used to run the elevator up and down, the lady that ran the elevator let me run it.” The entrance for the upstairs was just to the right of the parked car. There was a dentist across the hall named Dr. Proctor, he added. Laura Comini said the elevator operator was E. Rose. “It was a big building, it was too bad to see it go,” she said. Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart wrote: “When I was a very young girl, I had to go through the BIG double doors, up the BIG elevator to see my dentist, who traveled up from Portland once a month. He put braces on my teeth, which I hated. It was such a BIG building, you know how things are when you're little.” Kathy Ursprung said the U.S. Bank Building in The Dalles was the first branch bank in the United States it opened in 1933. Before that, banks were stand-alone institutions. For many years after that, many states still did not allow branch banking. “My mother, Josephine Brown, owned a beauty salon in that building known as the Vanity Beauty Shop not long before it was torn down. I remember visiting her there as a very young child,” Ursprung added. Bill Dodson of Rufus said there was still a clock like the one pictured on the old building in Hood River. He said the building was torn down in the early 1960s. “I helped put the glass into the new building,” he said. The Portland-based bank’s history is online at www.pdxhistory.com/html/portland_banks.html. The building was torn down in the 1960s, according to one caller.

photo

Terray Harmon and Jerry Phillips contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The photograph was part of an extensive collection labeled: “Chamber of Commerce, public buildings and orchards.” The individual envelope containg this photograph identifies the subject as “Cherries, June 1949 season.” The photograph appears to show a camp for migrant workers set up in the area of Kramer Field in The Dalles, which was at that time the county rodeo grounds, said Teray Harmon. Additional images show camps elsewhere in The Dalles area, although exact locations are not noted. Workers are shown in both the orchards and at the Cherry Growers. Jerry Phillips noted the tents and camp setup resembles that of a temporary US Army encampment at Rufus in about 1943.

20 years ago – 1997

Just as their demolition is being sought, the city may upgrade the historical status of the downtown grain elevators. The downtown historic district, established in 1986, is due for a review this spring. In that review, the elevators will probably be recommended to be upgraded from a “noncontributing resource” to a “contributing resource”, according to a staff report by The Dalles Community Development Department.

Despite poor weather – and poor weather forecasts – over the past month, Mt. Hood Meadows remains on track for a better-than-average season. Thanks to its record-setting early opening, the resort is “substantially ahead” of last year’s lackluster skier number, General Manager Dave Riley said. “We’re faring quite well, year-to-date,” he said.

WASHINGTON (AP) – The government plans to raise $7 billion Jan. 29 in its first auction of securities designed to shield investors from inflation while shrinking the cost of government borrowing. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin said Tuesday the notes will be auctioned quarterly in denominations of $1,000, the minimum purchase, and will mature in 10 years. But since they will be tied to the government’s Consumer Price Index, their value will increase as prices increase.

40 years ago – 1977

Penny Willcox will leave Sunday to represent The Dalles in the state junior miss contest sponsored by the Jaycees. She won the local contest in November. She is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James Willcox, The Dalles, and is a junior at The Dalles High School. Winners are selected on the basis of scholastic achievement, poise, youth fitness and interviews. She won a $100 scholarship here plus the expense-paid trip to Portland for the state contest next week.

You can still make reservations for the forum on The Dalles airshed Monday noon. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality will have its planning and projects director there.

Coffee interests say a fungus is attacking crops now and they are considering a $3 per sack increase in the tax to offset expected losses.

WASHINGTON (UPI) – President Carter met with his National Security Council today and indicated the White House will lead the way in complying with his request that Americans turn thermostats down to 65 degrees.

60 years ago – 1957

Although the sun tried intermittently to break through the falling snow today, the U.S. Weather Bureau predicted occasional light snow for The Dalles and Hood River valley through Wednesday. High temperature here yesterday was 22 above zero and low in the 24 hours ending at 8 a.m. today was 19, with 2.8 inches of snow reported up to 8 a.m. The Weather Bureau expects a high Wednesday of between 25 and 30 after a low tonight of between 15 and 20.

A clause stipulating use of local labor on school construction contracts is wanted so that “dollars earned in The Dalles will be spent here,” E. V. Espey, business agent for Carpenters local No. 1896, said today.

There’s danger in knocking icicles from the eaves of your house, Irv Reierson, Wasco-Sherman sanitarian, warned today. The frozen drippings are heavy and sharp, he reminded, and anyone struck by an icicle could be seriously injured.

The heavy snow has also slowed down work on The Dalles dam. The Atkinson-Ostrander co., contractor on the closure dam between the Oregon shore and the powerhouse, has closed down operations.

80 years ago – 1937

Dedication of the new First Congregational church of The Dalles will be observed here over a two-weeks’ period beginning January 31 and extending through February 14, when an address by Dr. Raymond C. Brooks of Los Angeles will be a feature of the formal dedicatory services on that date. The ceremonial entry service, which was planned for this coming Sunday and which will be the first of the series of dedicatory events, has been postponed until January 31 due to the prevalence of influenza and the inclement weather.

Miss Mary Sigman, one of two city school teachers whose resignations were refused by the District 12 school board early this month, was married at Dufur last night to James A. Hunt of that city. The marriage violates a clause in the now Mrs. Hunt’s teaching contract, requiring that female teachers remain single. The school board declined to accept the teacher’s resignation on grounds that her contract was as binding on her as on the board, and that she was in good faith obligated to fill out her year as a teacher. Similar action was taken against another teacher, Miss Margaret Hillsdon. Refusal to accept the resignation of the two teachers excited considerable comment due to the fact that the board’s action was a departure from former policy.

Devastating floods swept into 11 states today, forcing upwards of 125,000 persons from their homes, isolating communities and bringing millions of dollars in damage. Eleven were known dead. From the Ohio reiver at Pittsburgh – which spilled over into the famous “Golden triangle” in the business distract – flood damage was reported over thousands of acres stretching to Cairo where the Ohio runs into the Mississippi.

PORTLAND (UP) – With literally thousands of birds in Oregon dying of starvation or freezing, or both, President Harry Daniel of the Oregon Humane society today saw personal aid by citizens the only salvation. Humane society officers, returning from a loop trip from Portland to Tillamook via McMinnville and along the coast route through Seaside and Astoria, reported seeing thousands of dead birds along the highway. Daniel said that if bits of suet, grain, bread crumbs and other food are spread about where the birds can get at it many of them will be saved. He said that robins, songbirds, and even crows are succumbing to the rigorous weather.

100 years ago – 1917

That Clark, Kendall & company consider themselves the buyers of the local good roads bonds, is indicated by the fact that Ralph H. Schneeloch, their representative, came here Saturday, asked for a conference with the county court, and then requested that the following agreement be signed. Clark, Kendall & company evidently, believe the supreme court will uphold the legality of the local bonds, but do not want to be bound by their original bid indefinitely, fearing that the bond market might fall. This action on the part of Clark, Kendall & company is another refutation of the report that has been circulated here to the effect that Teal, Minor & Winfree, bond experts for Clark, Kendall & company, had ruled adversely against the Wasco county bonds.

Joe Williams of Dufur passed yesterday here.

Charles E. Fuller of Portland, field agent for the Travelers’ Insurance company, is spending a few days in The Dalles on business.

The table proper is a piece of dining room furniture supported by hand-carved legs and father’s pocketbook. It is the family table, or table that the family sit at. The café table is contra-distinguished from the family table by its diversity of uses. The café table is sometimes sat at, often sat on and not infrequently sat under, depending upon the inebriate condition of the setees. Then we have the round-table. The round-table is what government officials sit at when they don’t want to be on the square. That leaves the time table. The time table is an instrument of torture designed to keep you from finding out when your train goes.

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