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Looking Back on January 29, 2017

Karen Pholehn, Agnes Brown, Mark Holland, Laura Commini, Lucile Stephens and Terray Harmon all contributed to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery, above, was taken by George Lindsay in June, 1949. It was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The specific location was not noted, but additional negatives in the set show the facility off First Street downtown The Dalles currently owned and operated by Oregon Cherry Growers.
Karen Polehn identified it as The Dalles Cherry Growers, back in the 40s or 50s, a sorting line for first cherries. The building is currently owned by Oregon Cherry Growers. The line was likely in the main floor of the west building, where the big truck unloading parking lot is by the scales.
Agnes Brown said the photograph was of one of the cherry packing lines in The Dalles. She worked packing boxes when she was about 16, and noted that an inspector, who looks like her aunt Mary Fleck, would randomly inspect packed boxes as they sorted and packed. 
Mark Holland said it looked like The Dalles Cherry Growers original cherry sorting line, where his grandfather, B. Holland, delivered his cherries using big wooden boxes.
Lucile Stephens also remembered working on a sorting line, in the brine area.
Regarding a previous History Mystery on the old U.S. Bank building, Laura Commini clarified that the name of the elevator operator was Mrs. Ernie Rhodes.

Karen Pholehn, Agnes Brown, Mark Holland, Laura Commini, Lucile Stephens and Terray Harmon all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, was taken by George Lindsay in June, 1949. It was scanned from a 4- by 5-inch black and white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The specific location was not noted, but additional negatives in the set show the facility off First Street downtown The Dalles currently owned and operated by Oregon Cherry Growers. Karen Polehn identified it as The Dalles Cherry Growers, back in the 40s or 50s, a sorting line for first cherries. The building is currently owned by Oregon Cherry Growers. The line was likely in the main floor of the west building, where the big truck unloading parking lot is by the scales. Agnes Brown said the photograph was of one of the cherry packing lines in The Dalles. She worked packing boxes when she was about 16, and noted that an inspector, who looks like her aunt Mary Fleck, would randomly inspect packed boxes as they sorted and packed. Mark Holland said it looked like The Dalles Cherry Growers original cherry sorting line, where his grandfather, B. Holland, delivered his cherries using big wooden boxes. Lucile Stephens also remembered working on a sorting line, in the brine area. Regarding a previous History Mystery on the old U.S. Bank building, Laura Commini clarified that the name of the elevator operator was Mrs. Ernie Rhodes.

photo

Lucile Stevens, Russ Brown, Laura Comini, Jack, Terray Harmon, Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart, Kathy Ursprung, and Nan Wimmers all contributed to this week’s report. Last week’s History Mystery, at right, was scanned from a black-and-white negative from the archives of The Dalles Chronicle/The Dalles Optimist. It is part of a collection taken for the Chamber of Commerce, and is dated 1949. Most of the collection bears the photographer’s stamp in red ink, one reading, “GEORGE LINDSAY, 312 Federal Street, THE DALLES, ORE,” and another “GEORGE LINDSAY, ‘Your Story in Pictures,’ 212 Federal ST., THE DALLES, OREGON.” The photograph was dated 1949, with no month or day. Other photographs in the collection were dated 1949, in the months of December and April. The building was the U.S. National Bank building at the Northwest corner of East 3rd and Washington Streets. The lower floor was the bank, the upper floors held professional offices, including doctors, dentists and lawyers. Russ Brown said his mother owned the Vanity Beauty Shop on the third floor, just above the clock. “As a child I used to run the elevator up and down, the lady that ran the elevator let me run it.” The entrance for the upstairs was just to the right of the parked car. There was a dentist across the hall named Dr. Proctor, he added. Laura Comini said the elevator operator was E. Rose. “It was a big building, it was too bad to see it go,” she said. Bobetta (Schilling) Stewart wrote: “When I was a very young girl, I had to go through the BIG double doors, up the BIG elevator to see my dentist, who traveled up from Portland once a month. He put braces on my teeth, which I hated. It was such a BIG building, you know how things are when you're little.” Kathy Ursprung said the U.S. Bank Building in The Dalles was the first branch bank in the United States it opened in 1933. Before that, banks were stand-alone institutions. For many years after that, many states still did not allow branch banking. “My mother, Josephine Brown, owned a beauty salon in that building known as the Vanity Beauty Shop not long before it was torn down. I remember visiting her there as a very young child,” Ursprung added. Bill Dodson of Rufus said there was still a clock like the one pictured on the old building in Hood River. He said the building was torn down in the early 1960s. “I helped put the glass into the new building,” he said. The Portland-based bank’s history is online at www.pdxhistory.com/html/portland_banks.html. The building was torn down in the 1960s, according to one caller.

20 years ago – 1997

A family that included a new baby lost all their possessions in a fire that extensively damaged their home on Tuesday afternoon.

Oregon’s snowpack is well above average and mainly at high elevation, meaning there likely will be plenty of water for summer but little potential for flooding early this year. In The Dalles, the December snowpack was 200 percent of normal, matching a 1985 record, and officials expect the January snowpack also to be above normal.

A one-vehicle rollover accident one mile west of The Dalles yesterday blocked traffic on Highway 80 for an hour while emergency personell extracted the driver.

Completion of a heating system build, the renovation of an auditorium, and reroofing the buildings are only a few of the items on the list of projects to finish up at Columbia Gorge Community College – and plans are being made to do just that.

40 years ago – 1977

The transfer of the Stone Machinery Co. Caterpillar Tractor dealership here, to Halton Tractor Co. of Portland was announced today. Officials of both firms made the announcement. The change is effective Monday. Stone has sold its building and inventory to Halton, the franchise for Caterpillar will be acquired by Halton, and all local employes of Stone will remain to operate the Halton agency here.

A decision may come Monday on whether to call a revenue bond issue to finance a state office building in The Dalles.

A two-week stoppage in admission of residents to Columbia Basin Nursing Home will end Feb. 1.

60 years ago – 1957

Proposed federal aid system projects in Wasco, Hood River and Gilliam counties are among those for which details were released this week by State Highway Engineer W. C. Williams. The tentative plans approved by the State Highway Commission involve 21 federal secondary highway projects in nine Oregon counties totaling $1,807,000.

Old Jaycees don’t fade away, they just hide, Jack Kalinoski says. Kalinoski, a member of The Dalles Junior Chamber of Commerce board of directors, is anxious to get in touch with any former Jaycees here who belonged to the organization from 1939 to 1949. The state Jaycee historian is compiling histories of the various clubs.

Temperatures went as low as nine degrees below zero in The Dalles last night and are predicted as low as zero for tonight. Temperature at The Dalles airport, where readings usually vary several degrees from those within the city, was four degrees below zero at 7:30 a.m. today.

80 years ago – 1937

A snowstorm of blizzard proportions today had completed the job of blockading most of the county’s outlying districts, and had closed at least one main highway route in this vicinity.

Two fires caused damage of approximately $2,500 last night and this morning. One of the fires, starting from an overheated stove at 10:25 last night, broke out in a combined bakery shop and store operated by Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Brown at 1302 Bluff street, causing a loss of between $1,4500 and $2,000 to baking machinery and store stock. Adjoining living quarters were saved, firemen said.

100 years ago – 1917

FOR RENT—Furnished housekeeping rooms. Inquire 805 Alvord street.

Eyes tested, glasses fitted. Dr. George F. Newhouse.

L. L. Mann and children have returned to their Pendleton home, after passing the week-end with Mr. Mann’s uncle, D. J. Cooper, and other relatives.

In the circuit court of the state of Oregon for Wasco county. Henry L. Kuck, executor of the Will and estate of Geo. Anderson, deceased, plaintiff, vs. Pearl Shelton Jarvis and Pearl P. Jarvis, husband and wife, the Citizens Bank of Portland, Oregon, a corporation, and the Oregon-Washington Investment company, a corporation, Defendants.

GOLD HILL, Ore., Jan. 29. – It is believed a pack of timber wolves killed and devoured John Hammersley, a government hunter, on Willows flats in Jackson county. Hammersley has disappeared. Searches found a man’s bones, which had been gnawed and scattered; a rifle, shreds of clothing and the corpses of three wolves. There were indications of desperate struggle.

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