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Looking Back on February 18, 2018

Terray Harmon contributed to this report.
The photograph above is labeled Celilo Queen, and was taken to promote their spring Salmon Festival in 1972. It was scanned from The Dalles Chronicle archives. Pictured are Karen Jim, Roger Begay, Wilson Begay and Marcella jim, April 1971.The banner reads, “MISS NAT’L CONGRESS AMERICAN INDIANS.” The location appears to be at the bottom of Union Street, with the port dock in the far background, said Terray Harmon.


Terray Harmon contributed to this report. The photograph above is labeled Celilo Queen, and was taken to promote their spring Salmon Festival in 1972. It was scanned from The Dalles Chronicle archives. Pictured are Karen Jim, Roger Begay, Wilson Begay and Marcella jim, April 1971.The banner reads, “MISS NAT’L CONGRESS AMERICAN INDIANS.” The location appears to be at the bottom of Union Street, with the port dock in the far background, said Terray Harmon.



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Mr. Viers, Grant Robins, Terray Harmon, Rae Wickersham and others contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, is a gold dredge, according to two callers. Terray Harmon noted that these four callers agree that it is a dredge, set up as a gold dredge. Terray Harmon said there was a time when they were set up as gold dredges, especially in the Baker area of eastern Oregon. “They build a pond, start digging, and they dig forward. The water stayed with them, and the tailing go off the back. The dredges had no built-in means of propultion, but used their own bucket to both dig and and pull themselves forward as they worked. They had to be in still water,” Harmon said. One caller thought the dredge might be working in Mill Creek. Mr. Viers said it looked like the dredge in Sumptner, Ore., and Grant Robbins also said it looked like the dredges in eastern Oregon. The photograph was located in a “History Mystery” folder at the Chronicle, which was eventually moved into storage, but the print was unlabeled.

20 years ago – 1998

The Oregon Veterans Home in The Dalles was host Tuesday to more than 50 persons concerned about eligibility rules to enter the facility. A public hearing conducted by the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs drew public testimony on financial, physical, and behavioral requirements for entry into the 151-bed skilled care nursing home, which opened late last year and currently has 34 residents.

For the first time in years, The Dalles School District finds itself with some money to spend on classroom supplies and equipment.

Imagine a community whose norms didn’t support the use of tobacco by any of its citizens. That’s what a group of local citizens would like to see happen by the year 2003.

Julie Kroneman — a ventriloquist, a puppeteer and a magician — will create some memories for those who attend the Church of the Nazarene (1313 Mt. Hood, The Dalles) this Thursday through Sunday. Kroneman has taken her act to the Ukraine, Portugal, Great Britain, Samoa, New Zealand, Fiji and Australia.

WASHINGTON — A government auction of mammoth slices of airwaves is drawing companies that seek new fortunes in nascent wireless technology for telephone, television and Internet services.

40 years ago – 1978

Every household is beset by computers. More and more people are even carrying electronic gadgets in their pockets to cope with the daily encounters of arithmetic, algebra and even engineering problems. To help meet the changing world, The Dalles High School is expanding its effort to deal with the electronic wizardry. District 12 is budgeting $18,800 to purchase a micro-computer for instructional purposes at the high school.

An artists studio clearance sale will be held at The Dalles Art Center from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. today and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Many art objects will be discounted prices.

Plans have been announced by Ron Keyser, pastor of The Dalles Assembly of God, for the kick-off dinner of their building fund drive. Featured speaker for the potluck dinner meeting to be held at The Portage Inn Tuesday will be Robert Book, church building specialist of Santa Rosa, Calif.

CRANSTON, R.I. (UPI) – President Carter said today “good progress,” is being made in settling the nationwide coal strike, declaring the “welfare of our nation” depends on the success of the negotiations. Carter has indicated he does not want to invoke the Taft-Hartley Act to get the miners back to work, but that if necessary, he will take more drastic measures.

60 years ago – 1958

Henry Triplett, a Dalles dam painter injured in a car-truck accident Aug. 7, 1956, testified in his own behalf in Circuit Court this morning, telling the six man and six woman jury that the car in which he was a passenger had the green light at the time of the collision with a loaded cattle truck driven by Ronald Baker, 19, Hermiston.

By UNITED PRESS – Gale warnings were up on the southern Oregon and northern California coasts today but the weather man said some letup was expected in heavy rains which have brought slides and flooding to widespread areas.

City councilmen last night voted an intention to improve an additional seven streets as part of the 1958 street improvement program.

WASHINGTON (UP) – The administration’s legislative and economic high command today ruled out attempts to buy prosperity with a federal “spending orgy.” It also said no to antirecession tax cuts now, banking instead on expectations of a business upswing in midyear and on economy-bolstering programs already started.

LONDON (UP) – Children of U.S. servicemen in London who use special daily buses to school must toe the line. Among the regulations issued to them, rule eight bans use of fireworks or any explosives.

80 years ago – 1938

The oldest bicyclist in the Dalles, Charlie Burchtorf, could have encircled the world twice had he pedaled in a straight line during the past 45 years. This was learned yesterday afternoon when Mr. Burchdorf, aged 64, took out a bicycle license at the city hall. He travels the one-mile distance between his home and his small shop four times each day. In the 45 years, he estimates he has pedaled more than 60,000 miles.

On or about March 21, creditors of the defunct First National bank of The Dalles will receive a 10 per cent dividend, according to a recent announcement by J. B. McCook, receiver.

Theodore Eugene Cole, 34, of The Dalles, died early this morning in a local hospital. Funeral arrangements were to be announced later by C. R. Callaway & Son. Mr. Cole is survived by his wife.

RODESSA, La., Feb. 18. (UP) – Fumes from a wrecked gas well spread across town today and added the danger of an explosion to the horror of last night’s tornado that killed an estimated 30 and injured scores of persons.

100 years ago – 1918

The Armenian relief drive is in full swing in The Dalles this week. The executive committee met this morning and the drive in the business district will begin in earnest tomorrow morning. “Let all business houses be prepared to make their subscriptions to this worthy cause, when the committee calls on them,” is the appeal of the committee.

The first returns from the smileage book campaign, which is now on in Wasco county, are from Fairbanks. Clarence L. Look is the district chairman.

“The Use of New Flours and Substitutes” is the topic of our Home Economics clubs this week. Many recipes and suggestions will be given out.

That there “is not now, and has not been in several months at least, any organized under-ground channel of bootlegging,” is the belief of the members of the grand jury, which investigated the booze question last week. The jurors made their report to the court Saturday and were discharged. The probers also investigated the matter of “seditious remarks,” but found nothing to report to the federal authorities.

If the Wittenberg-King company is given a government contract, the local Dalles King’s Products, (Wittenberg-King) company plant, which was shut down last week, will be started again with a full crew. The following was published by the Portland Telegram Saturday: Dried fruit and vegetables from Oregon are likely to be used extensively by the United States army. The quartermaster’s department at Washington has wired inquiries to commercial clubs in various parts of the state for information about number and capacity of dehydrating plants, requesting samples of products and saying that if goods are satisfactory contracts for output can be made immediately.



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