News and information from our partners

Looking back on February 25, 2018

Mary Davis, Gary Conley, Terray Harmon and Myron Egbert all contributed  to this report.
Last week’s History Mystery was scanned from a 2 1/4- by 2 1/4-inch black and white negative. Information on the envelope reads, “Threshing Bee Advance, Oregonian, 1972.”
The Threshing Bee was a summer festival in Dufur focused on the wheat harvest.
Mary Davis wrote the object is a “thrashing log” built by Lewis Anderson of Pleasant Ridge area near Dufur.  His 1895 house, 1890 barn, granary and outhouse were all moved and are now part of Fort Dalles Museum/Anderson Homestead, located at 15th and Garrison. 
This unusual farm implement can be viewed in the threshing room at the Anderson barn, said Myron Egbert, a volunteer docent at the museum. 
It was made from a solid piece of Tamarrack Pine and was very heavy. 
Egbert said it looked like the log was photographed behind the Balch Hotel in Dufur, as did Gary Conley.
Conley also noted that the wheels were early attempts at threshing and were not particularly successful.
 “They chopped up the grain real bad, when they were knocking the grain out of the heads.”
Lucile Stephens of Dufur confirmed the picture was taken behind the Balch Hotel in Dufur, and said the man in the cap was Bob DePriest.
She added that the introduction of the Threshing Bee to Dufur brought many old pieces of machinery to town, much of which was restored, and the equipment now makes up a large part of the displays at the Dufur Museum.


Mary Davis, Gary Conley, Terray Harmon and Myron Egbert all contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery was scanned from a 2 1/4- by 2 1/4-inch black and white negative. Information on the envelope reads, “Threshing Bee Advance, Oregonian, 1972.” The Threshing Bee was a summer festival in Dufur focused on the wheat harvest. Mary Davis wrote the object is a “thrashing log” built by Lewis Anderson of Pleasant Ridge area near Dufur. His 1895 house, 1890 barn, granary and outhouse were all moved and are now part of Fort Dalles Museum/Anderson Homestead, located at 15th and Garrison. This unusual farm implement can be viewed in the threshing room at the Anderson barn, said Myron Egbert, a volunteer docent at the museum. It was made from a solid piece of Tamarrack Pine and was very heavy. Egbert said it looked like the log was photographed behind the Balch Hotel in Dufur, as did Gary Conley. Conley also noted that the wheels were early attempts at threshing and were not particularly successful. “They chopped up the grain real bad, when they were knocking the grain out of the heads.” Lucile Stephens of Dufur confirmed the picture was taken behind the Balch Hotel in Dufur, and said the man in the cap was Bob DePriest. She added that the introduction of the Threshing Bee to Dufur brought many old pieces of machinery to town, much of which was restored, and the equipment now makes up a large part of the displays at the Dufur Museum.



photo

Terray Harmon contributed to this report. The photograph above is labeled Celilo Queen, and was taken to promote their spring Salmon Festival in 1972. It was scanned from The Dalles Chronicle archives. Pictured are Karen Jim, Roger Begay, Wilson Begay and Marcella jim, April 1971.The banner reads, “MISS NAT’L CONGRESS AMERICAN INDIANS.” The location appears to be at the bottom of Union Street, with the port dock in the far background, said Terray Harmon.

20 years ago – 1998

It is a pesky pair of numbers, with the undeniable ability to spawn both frustration and anger. The numbers are 16 and 6. The former is the number of full-time administrators at Columbia Gorge Community College. The latter is the number of full-time faculty. Those two numbers have generated spirited discussions among disgruntled faculty who see it as grossly top-heavy and possibly a leading cause of the college’s financial predicament, and among administrators who defend their number, their work, and their role in maintaining the college’s viability.

The first real step in the construction of a new fire station was made on Monday night when the Mid-Columbia Fire and Rescue District board awarded a bid for site preparation work.

A resident in the 900 block of Federal Street reported the theft of a battery for a children’s four wheeled vehicle.

PEORIA, Ill. (AP) – The United Auto Workers rank-and-file rejected both their leadership’s advice and a contract offer from Caterpillar Inc., ensuring their 6½-year labor battle will continue.“The whole proposal wasn’t a good enough issue for anyone to accept,” said Bill Wheat, a union worker who had been fired.

40 years ago – 1978

With all the time and money the state spends to train some of its 36,000 employees, the prospect of using Columbia Park Hospital for this function has surfaced. It is only at the information gathering stages, but the state has been asked to look at prospects.

A Pops and Novelty concert by The Dalles High Symphonic Band is scheduled Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the junior high school gymnasium.

Should state surpluses be turned back to the taxpayer? Most people contacted this week on the idea said yes but not all felt that way. The topic is expected to be somewhat of a campaign issue this year and efforst are being made to put it on the November ballot.

WASHINGTON (UPI) – President Carter announced settlement of the nation’s longest coal strike Friday and urged miners to approve it or face the “drastic” legal action he had planned to use to get the valuable energy source available again.

The public will get a chance to see a helicopter ambulance at The Dalles General Hospital at 10 a.m. today. The helicopter is owned by Emmanual Hospital in Portland and is being brought here so that hospital and emergency medical people can become familiar with its use.

60 years ago – 1958

Veterans with long periods of continuous membership in the American Legion will be given special recognition at a meeting of Dalles Post No. 19 this evening.

Although blood donated here during the past 12 months has exceeded the amount administered to patients at three local hospitals, monthly consumption figures vary widely and future demands cannot be anticipated, blood program officials emphasize.

Employees as well as employers are urged to attend a Thursday morning retailers’ session at PP & L meeting room to hear a Paul Harvey tape recording produced during Advertising Week, according to plans announced by James L. Johnson, chairman of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce retail trade committee.

The Dalles area was lashed by high winds during the night but there were no reports of serious damage here. Peak wind velocity recorded by the Civil Aeronautics Administration at the airport on the Washington side of the river was 30 miles per hour at 1 a.m. today.

PORTLAND (UP)—Firemen today appeared to be winning a battle against a four-alarm fire at the Portland Gas & Coke Company’s Linnton plant which sent huge columns of black smoke into the air. Flames shot more than 100 feet into the air after a 7000-gallon creosote tank burst into flames shortly before 11 a.m.

80 years ago – 1938

The Port of The Dalles dock last night and this morning was graced by the United States lighthouse tender Rhododendron, the first vessel of this type even to berth here. The tender, in this section on an exploratory cruise to locate sites for approximately 20 new river lights, tied up at the port about 4:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

Benton Mays, 87, prominent pioneer resident of The Dalles, died Thursday at 6:45 p.m. at his residence on Laughlin street, after a month’s illness.

PRAGUE, CZECHO-SLOVAKIA, Feb. 25. (UP) – Czechoslovakia, fighting to retain her 3,500,000 citizens of German birth whom Adolf Hitler wants to reclaim for the Reich, has outlawed all outward forms of Nazism. There was no parade, no shouting last Sunday when Hitler in his Reichstag speech proclaimed a protectorage over the 10,000,000 continental Germans living outside of Germany. Laws forbid it. But occasionally on soft soil one sees the imprint of the swastika—made by a Nazi sympathizer who has outlined the nazi cross in hob-nails on the soles of his shoes.

VIENNA, Feb. 25. (UP) – Austrian Nazis demonstrated angrily today in reaction to Chancellor Kurt Schuschnigg’s vigorous speech proclaiming Austria’s independence and warning against the spread of Nazism in Austria.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 25. (UP) – President Roosevelt indicated today that he regards the battleship as supreme in its field. The president, asked about vulnerability of battleships to air attacks, pointed to his congressional recommendations to show he is convinced of superiority of the super-dreadnaughts.

100 years ago – 1918

PAPER MILL WORK—At Camas, Washington. Permanent work for steady men over 18 years old. Can also use carpenters at $3.80 to $4.20. Strike not yet declared off but mill running smoothly and without trouble and over 725 men on pay roll.

The ladies of the Congregational church will serve dinner in the basement of the church Tuesday, Feb. 26, from 5:30 p.m. until 8 o’clock. Fifty cents a plate.

Our war operations so far have cost less by far than we expected. It was estimated last summer that the expenditures of the war department in the year ending June 30, 1918, would be $8,790,000,000. For the first six months they aggregated only $1,762,000,000.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 25. – Urging the passage of his “labor conscription” bill, Senator McCumber today declared that “capital and labor, the Bolsheviki of American profiteers, are throttling the nation in its hour of trouble,” and that this profiteering is “encouraged and acquiesced in by the government.”

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., Feb. 25. – Eradication of evidences of sedition and disloyalty that have appeared in a few schools of the United States will be planned at the annual convention of the National Education association which opened here today.

BERLIN, Feb. 25. – The German forces have reached Zhitomir, the principal city of Volhynia. All the members of the special Russian army’s general staff, except the commander, were captured. Pernau, on the Gulf of Riga, was occupied. Dorpat and 3000 prisoners were taken by storm troops.



Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment

CLOSE X

Information from The Chronicle and our advertisers (Want to add your business to this to this feed?)