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Looking Back on January 14, 2018

Jeremy G. Anderson, MA, Donna Hackler and Terray Harmon contributed to this report.
Written on back of print: “Construction - Hamilton Bros. Hosp., July 1924 - Fourth and Washington Streets. Later Mid-Columbia Hosp.”
Jeremy G. Anderson, MA, with Mid-Columbia Center for Living, noted the building is now known as the Medical Arts Building located on the corner of Fourth and Washington.
Terray Harmon noted that the building was built in 1923, and much of the brick facing was covered later with stucco.


Jeremy G. Anderson, MA, Donna Hackler and Terray Harmon contributed to this report. Written on back of print: “Construction - Hamilton Bros. Hosp., July 1924 - Fourth and Washington Streets. Later Mid-Columbia Hosp.” Jeremy G. Anderson, MA, with Mid-Columbia Center for Living, noted the building is now known as the Medical Arts Building located on the corner of Fourth and Washington. Terray Harmon noted that the building was built in 1923, and much of the brick facing was covered later with stucco.



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An arrest made the front page of The Dalles Chronicle on Jan. 13, 1958.

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Gary Conley, Terray Harmon and Dale Roberts contributed to this report. Last week’s History Mystery, above, is scanned from an 8-by-10-inch glossy photograph found in the archives of The Dalles Chronicle. The typed caption, glued to the print, reads: “Easy level driving — Traffic flows smoothly along this two-lane section of US 30 between Rufus and Biggs. Future plans envisage creating a four-lane highway from Troutdale to The Dalles, from Emigrant Hill to La Grande and a four and two-lane highway from Baker to Ontario. (Highway Department Photo.)” (Olds Ferry crossed out, Ontario written in.) The print is undated. Gary Conley noted the view was “looking toward the ‘poplar grove,’ they used to call it,” and added that it was in the vicinity of the old Maryhill Ferry. Dale Roberts noted the photo was taken in the 1950s.

20 years ago – 1998

Teddy bears are multilingual and multicultural. That is why they help police communicate with children in the “Buddy Bears” program, and officers in the city police department, Wasco County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police all use them as a tool. Officer Brian Drake of the city police said there is a bear in the trunk of every patrol car.

With recent bad experience from the Oregon Veterans Home fresh in his mind, Wasco County Judge John Mabrey says he wants details – in writing – before considering a proposed Oregon National Guard armory/convention center site on a corner of Kramer Athletic Field.

The winter wonderland had a coating of ice this morning in The Dalles, and area schools were closed a third day, though Interstate 84 opened Tuesday night. As the rest of the state thawed out, The Dalles was still socked in at subfreezing temperatures this morning.

WASHINGTON (AP) – With cable TV rates rising four times faster than other inflation, the nation’s top telecommunications regulator promised Tuesday to review government pricing rules. But he wouldn’t commit to tightening them.

40 years ago – 1978

A stray female dog that had her left rear leg amputated after it was injured when the animal got caught in a trap is recovering at the Wasco County Animal Shelter. The Wasco County Humane Society is paying the cost of the surgery. The dog’s leg was removed and she will be available to be claimed by her owner or for adoption.

Western Zirconium’s plan to build a new plant is still in the works although investors are having management evaluate at least two sites other than Dallesport. Plant Manager Sam Worcester said Friday that he expected it would be at least two months before the evaluations were completed.

As Wasco County goes through the process of establishing land use plans to comply with the 14 statewide goals of the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission, complex issues are arising. It is not easy to establish rules for land use which please everyone.

A group of citizens are circulating a petition opposing the location of a convenience store at the intersection of 12th Street and Dry Hollow Road. The petition read: “We the undersigned either residents or landowners in the vicinity of 12th Street and Dry Hollow Road of The Dalles, Oregon, strongly object to the locating of a Circle K Corporation Convenience store on that corner.”

60 years ago – 1958

City police yesterday recovered two stolen cars and investigated ransacking of four other cars.

Late October is being considered as a date for formal dedication of The Dalles dam, the special events committee of The Dalles Chamber of Commerce has been advised by the Corps of Engineers.

A man who lives west of The Dalles is preparing to harvest what may be the earliest crop of garden peas in the history of this area. If spring-like weather continues, Vernon Younglove may get at least two pods of peas from vines that have been growing vigorously at his place not far from The Dalles Country Club.

Another of the winter series of pinochle card parties was held last Saturday evening in the Cherry Park Grange hall with nine tables in play. The party was preceded by a 6:30 potluck-style ranch supper.

The question of whether the PUD will be given part of the local public schools’ electric service business has been raised again before District 12 board. All of the local schools now are served by Pacific Power & Light Co.

80 years ago – 1938

The question of the right of private fishermen to fish on shore lands of the Columbia river which were deeded to the Seufert Brothers company by the state of Oregon in 1897 may be involved in a suit on file in circuit court here today in which Glen Andrews, plaintiff, seeks $2000 general, $150 special and $500 exemplary damages from Seufert brothers. Andrews’ complaint alleges false arrest and loss of expected income from the current commercial fishing season through alleged illegal restraint and later inability to secure his old fishing place on the river, after the dismissal of his appeal to the circuit court following conviction and fine on the grounds of trespass.

The 50th anniversary of the great blizzard of January 12, 1888, has brought vivid memories to a Dalles citizen in regard to that event. H. G. Miller recalls that on the morning of the blizzard he came very close to losing his life in that celebrated storm, and claims the only reason he is alive to tell of his experiences is the fact that his dog seemed to know of the impending storm and acted in such manner as to hasten the trip from the little town of Dustin, Neb., to the Miller homestead—approximately three-quarters of a mile distant.

The Samoan Clipper, 19-ton plane that has pioneered Pan American Airways trans-Pacific flights ahead of scheduled service, was wrecked while on the last leg of its first commercial flight from Honolulu to Aukland, N. Z. Wreckage was found in the sea 14 miles from Pago Pago.

100 years ago – 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Corson of this city have received a letter form their son, Earl, who arrived in France early in December with Company B. 116th engineers.

“Meatless” days and meals in Oregon, until two months from today, need be only “porkless.” No less an authority than Herbert Hoover, national food administrator, has lifted all restrictions on the eating of beef, mutton, lamb and veal, for residents of Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada, Arizona and Idaho, until March 13, says the Oregonian.

Our armies must be clothed as well as fed and armed. They must be clothed with wool. And therein lies a difficulty which will become more evident as the year advances. Soldiers wear out their clothes faster than civilians. It takes more wool therefore to clothe an army of a million men than to clothe a million men at home. The tremendous extent of the military demand has hardly begun to dawn on the general public. It is stated on good authority that it will require, to outfit our armies this year, more wool than the entire production of the United States amounts to.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 14. – Interstate Commerce Commissioner Anderson today told the senate railroad legislation committee that the right of railroad employes to quit work or strike had not been abridged under the new government control of the roads.



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