Home and Garden


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Time to get rid of noxious weed

City workers from The Dalles are working to remove puncture vine from public properties and asking residents to eradicate the noxious weed.

Fruit fly fight on

Cherry Fruit Fly models developed by Oregon State University indicate that the pest emerged in The Dalles last Friday. The emergence of the fly signals the beginning of a very important control program against this insect, which is the industry's chief pest, according to Lynn Long, OSU Extension horticulturist.

Gardening classes offered in Sherman County

If sunny April days give you the urge to go outside, dig in the dirt and plant something, the ”Spring Into Vegetable Gardening” classes offered by OSU Sherman County Extension might be for you.

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It’s time to start your garden right

Start your garden off right this spring and get your plant starts from your local Wasco County Master Gardeners at our annual Spring Plant Fair. The fair is Saturday, May 7, 9 .m. to 2 p.m. at The Dalles City Park at Fifth and Union streets.

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Twisted Vine hopes to serve all gardeners of all types

With a plethora of garden stores catering to marijuana growers in the Portland area, and another in Hood River, Maria Museke and her partner Cole Griffiths decided to locate their garden store in The Dalles. “We saw a need for a garden store in The Dalles,” Mueske explained. “There aren't many stores east of here.” After eight months in business at 747 E. Second Street, next to Hank's Auto, they are encouraged they made the right choice.

Lawn invasion: What to do when moss threatens

Once again this spring I am noticing that moss is encroaching on my lawn in those shady areas where my grass is a little weak. I saw it last year, but didn’t do anything about it, and it’s back with a vengeance this year and is forcing me to act.

Gardeners dig program

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Coffee at the DIG

Coffee at the DIG offers free summer gardening information hosted by knowledgeable community members at The Dalles Imagination Garden, Klindt Drive and Steelhead Way. Each half-hour seminar starts at 9 a.m. on Saturdays. The informational series continues with new topics July 19 and 26 and August 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30.

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Conservation Corner: Healthy soil sets the stage for a healthy garden

Gardening, whether flowers or vegetables is probably one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve encountered. At first it can be a little intimidating. There are a lot of factors to consider, but gardening becomes easier to understand through experience.

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Help children and grandchildren love gardening

A couple of weeks ago I was outside pruning my roses when my three-year-old granddaughter asked if she could help. I told her that I was afraid that the thorns might poke her if she wasn’t wearing gloves. She promptly went into the house and got her woolen mittens. I gave her some very small loppers that we have and helped her to cut some small canes. She loved being able to help PaPa in the garden. Later that day her mother took her to the store and bought her some real garden gloves.

Extension explores Portland gardens

Oregon State University Home Extension Services hosts the Mid-Columbia Family and Community Education Study Groups on the annual Spring Tour, Portland’s Glorious Gardens, Thursday, May 22.

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Extension Cord: Reduce your waste with upcycling, recycling

The United States is one of the largest consumers and wasters in the world. Each consumer contributes about 2,500 pounds of waste per year and of that waste, over half can be reduced, recycled or reused.

Gorge Grown offers food leaders training

Gorge Grown Food Network (GGFN) is gearing up to launch their second implementation of a program that develops leadership abilities in its participants.

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Dreaming Green

January is a good time to pore over seed catalogs and get the garden ready for growing time

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Owls and other wildlife dying from rodent bait

SALEM, Ore.— Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife veterinarians advise home and land owners that poison baits used to control mice and rats can sicken or kill owls, hawks, foxes, bobcats and other species. To protect wildlife, people should carefully follow product directions and explore other options for rodent control.



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