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Marine Zone fishing report, Dec. 7

BOTTOM FISHING Lingcod fishing was good out of Garibaldi with near limits. Elsewhere on the coast the average catch was one ling for every two anglers. Catches of rockfish were good in the south and south central coast with near limits. From Newport north, catches were about half that. Bottom fishing is good when conditions permit. Fishing for groundfish is now open at all depths.

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Marine Zone weekly wildlife viewing update, Aug 7

Great blue herons and great egrets Coastal estuaries are host to two impressive birds this time of year, great egrets and great blue herons. Both herons and egrets are wading birds that prowl the shallows looking for fish, crustaceans and amphibians.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing update, Aug. 7

BOTTOM FISHING The hot ports last week were Brookings, Gold Beach, Garibaldi and Pacific City with most bottomfishers getting between five and six rockfish and at least one lingcod. Most other ports reported catches of between two and three rockfish – most likely because windy conditions on the central coast blew boats off the water and shortened fishing times.

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Marine Zone weekly wildlife viewing report

Seabird nesting in full swing From mainland areas that overlook coastal rocks and islands, you can see bald eagles attack nesting common murres. Around 600,000 common murres return to each spring to Oregon’s wind-blown islands to raise their single chick.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing report

BOTTOM FISHING Most ports sampled reported catches of four to five rockfish again this week. About half of the anglers caught lingcod. The hot port last week was Brookings with most bottomfishers getting limits of rockfish and at least one lingcod. Fishing for groundfish is closed offshore of the 30-fathom line defined by latitude and longitude.

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Marine zone weekly wildlife viewing report

Puffins April, May, June, July best time to see Puffins. Best Place is Haystack Rock because it’s so close to shore. Tufted puffins are back on the Oregon Coast to nest for the summer and most of them are found on Three Arch Rocks National Wildlife Refuge. This sanctuary about two miles south of Cape Meares and one-half mile offshore west of Oceanside in Tillamook County. The three large rocks and six smaller ones make up the refuge, which is home to 12 species of seabirds breed here totaling 226,093 birds. This includes 30 percent of the Common murres breeding in Oregon and 21 percent of all common murres breeding in the eastern Pacific south of Alaska. This site also harbors 60 percent of the tufted puffin breeding population in Oregon. More than 800 brown pelicans have been seen here roosting and up to 13 bald eagles have been observed preying on seabirds.

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Marine zone weekly fishing report

BOTTOM FISHING Most ports sampled reported catches of four to five rockfish again this week. About half of the anglers caught lingcod. The hot port last week was Garibaldi with most bottomfishers getting limits of rockfish and at least one lingcod.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing report

Most ports sampled reported catches of four to five rockfish. About half of the anglers caught lingcod. The hot port last week was Garibaldi with most bottomfishers getting limits of rockfish and lingcod. Fishing for groundfish is closed offshore of the 30-fathom line defined by latitude and longitude.

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Central Zone weekly wildlife viewing report

Resident nesting species such as mallards, gadwall and cinnamon teal are still numerous, but will be harder to locate as females will be busy tending nests and broods. American wigeon, shoveler, green-winged teal and wood duck can still be seen, but are less common as most have migrated through. Numerous Canada goose broods have been seen and can be found throughout Crook County.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing report

Better than half the anglers out of Astoria landed Chinook salmon last week. Coho catches were much lower – only about one for every 10 anglers. On the rest of the coast there were no reported coho landings. One in 10 anglers caught Chinook south of Astoria. The exception was Winchester Bay where about four in 10 anglers caught a Chinook.

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Marine Zone weekly wildlife viewing report

Event: NestWatch at Nestucca Bay, June 29 Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge participates in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Project NestWatch Program. Join refuge volunteer Lee Sliman on Saturday, June 29, from 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. while she actively open nest boxes and monitors the progress of the refuge's avian families. Meet in the lower parking lot of Nestucca Bay Refuge. Nestwatch is a citizen science program where volunteers place and care for artificial nest boxes; monitor them; and then record nesting results in a nationwide database. For more information contact the refuge volunteer at 503-392-9047.

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Marine Zone fishing and wildlife viewing report

Saltwater News Bulletins You can subscribe to receive e-mails and text message alerts for marine topics you are interested in. To sign up go to http://dfw.state.or.us/MRP/bulletins/index.asp and enter your phone for text alerts and e-mail information to subscribe to email updates. It’s easy to unsubscribe at any time. Your phone and e-mail information will remain confidential. Six different lists of interest to ocean enthusiasts are available: Bottomfish (recreational), Halibut (recreational), Ocean Salmon (recreational), Ocean Salmon (commercial troll), Commercial Nearshore Groundfish, and Marine Reserves.

Weekly fishing reports for Oregon

Weekly fishing reports for Willamette, central, southeast, northeast, Columbia and marine zones. Great trout fishing continues The stars are aligning for some good trout fishing in the next few weeks. Water temperatures in lakes and reservoirs are still relatively cool, lots of trout have been stocked for both the Memorial Day and Free Fishing weekends, coastal rivers are now open for native cutthroat fishing and the weather looks good. Check out the latest updates in the Recreation Report to help plan your next fishing adventure.

Marine Zone weekly wildlife viewing report

Crab Molts Shellfish biologists on the north and south coast report early molting of male Dungeness crab. Crabs tend to molt all at once, so great numbers of their old shells can show up on the beach at one time. It can look like a major disaster occurred to the crab population, but it’s as natural as kids outgrowing their old shoes. You can tell the difference between a shell from a molt and a dead crab by looking at the molt line. If you are lucky, you may find a whole exuvia or crab molt. During the molt, the crab leaves even its old gills, antennae, and mouthparts behind. Every detail is there except the crab.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing report

Herring in Yaquina Bay Anglers are catching large herring in Yaquina Bay. There are no other reports of significant herring catches from other Oregon bays or estuaries, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t there. While most anglers catch herring for bait, they are excellent eating and good for you with higher omega 3 oil content than salmon. Try them smoked. Delicious! This is also a really fun fishery for kids.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing and wildlife viewing report

BOTTOM FISHING Fishing for rockfish continues to be good with the average rockfish catch at about five or six fish per angler. Lingcod catches are good at all ports surveyed at better than one fish per angler. Bottom fishing is closed offshore of the 30-fathom line defined by latitude and longitude.

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Marine Zone weekly fishing and wildlife viewing report

BOTTOM FISHING Fishing for rockfish continues to be good with the average rockfish catch at about five or six fish per angler. Lingcod catches are good at all ports surveyed at better than one fish per angler. Bottom fishing is closed offshore of the 30-fathom line defined by latitude and longitude. Cabezon retention is prohibited by all anglers until July 1. Retention of cabezon is allowed July 1 through Sept. 30. Under the federal cabezon quota, there is only enough cabezon to be open for two to three months during the busy summer period. When ODFW asked for public input in the fall, many people said they preferred a later season (July-September) over an earlier season. The daily bag and size limits remain the same (one-fish sublimit, 16-inch minimum length).

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Marine Zone weekly fishing, hunting and wildlife viewing

MARINE FISHING Saltwater News Bulletins You can subscribe to receive e-mails and text message alerts for marine topics you are interested in. Sign up online and enter your phone for text alerts and e-mail information to subscribe to email updates. It’s easy to unsubscribe at any time. Your phone and e-mail information will remain confidential. Six different lists of interest to ocean enthusiasts are available: Bottomfish (recreational), Halibut (recreational), Ocean Salmon (recreational), Ocean Salmon (commercial troll), Commercial Nearshore Groundfish, and Marine Reserves.

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